Busted Halo
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Dan Marschner :
7 article(s)

Dan Marschner, an Jesuit International Volunteer, writes from Arica, Chile.
October 1st, 2003
A Last Blast of Joy Over the Fiestas Patrias in Chile

The sheer amount of food is nauseating—a typical plate consists of beef, pork, chicken, sausage, potato salad, rice, corn salad, tomato salad, and a glass of wine. After an extensive grilling process, the traditional Chilean celebration of Independence Days is a vegetarian nightmare and a steak lover`s dream.
In order to properly demonstrate their patriotism, Chileans take two holidays (as well as spending the previous days in work parties) to bring the family together, eat obscenely large meals, and celebrate Chilean music, customs, and ideals.
The holidays naturally led me to reflect on the meaning of my two years as a Jesuit Volunteer here in Arica, as those years draw to a close. But I get ahead of myself……

June 16th, 2003
As Seen from a Distance

Though Americans living abroad might technically be defined as expatriates (from the Latin “banished ones”), they generally tend to think of themselves more as roaming ambassadors of national pride.
Aasalaamu aleikum, pilgrim We normally head out with the cowboy mentality of heading off into the wild blue yonder with our brains and brawn, ready to conquer the wilderness. We arrive in our new surroundings excited to share with the locals the superiority of our culture, ready to demonstrate the genius of our ways, and expecting people to learn from us.
In short, we often arrive at our new destination ready to establish our own little piece of Americana, convinced that we will succeed just as readily…

May 12th, 2003

Before I came to live in Arica, Chile, spending a week in silence sounded ridiculous. I love constant motion; I enjoy bumping into people and I gather strength from personal interaction. The idea of voluntarily submerging myself into my thoughts for six days, allowing for a minimum of human contact, appeared to be a terrible one.
But after I completed a second retreat during Holy Week as a required component of my JVI placement, I have never been more comfortable alone. I firmly believe that silence gives someone exactly what he needs, and particularly during the retreat I gained two major guiding principles: acceptance and awareness.
Doubt and acceptancePerhaps the most significant challenge of voluntarily…

March 20th, 2003
Global Perspectives on the War: Chile, South America

Arica, Chile—Even thousands of miles away from the current conflict in Iraq, war is the principal theme on people`s minds here. The newspaper carries stories of U.S. military might next to worldwide protests, with the front page often showing images of Iraqi children whose health has been violated by U.S. aggression.
I can only imagine the media overload that characterizes the U.S. currently when Arica, Chile—a town that is arguably as far from the war as one can be—is consumed by coverage. I cannot adequately express the frustration that this chaos causes in my heart. As a means of maintaining hope, I offer a few glimpses of peace that I pray may provide a blueprint of love to contrast with the current plans…

February 12th, 2003
Down to the Essentials

Yesterday, outside the Hogar de Cristo here in Arica, Chile, my mind boggled as I talked to a homeless, alcoholic, filthy and desperate man. Roberto stood outside the door, asking for food, obviously intoxicated. We began to talk, and I found myself struggling for an answer when he asked me why he should not throw himself off a cliff.
If he honestly wanted a motive, ten flashed into my mind instantly. I cannot imagine what keeps someone like him going. He´s 48, completely alone, and alcohol has ruled his life for years. His health is a shambles; long ago he lost contact with his family and friends; and he continually roams the streets looking for the next drink. What hope can a person like him possibly sustain?
Fundamental…

November 11th, 2002
A Chilean Community's New Home for Poor Seniors

Pride pulsated through my veins, turning me into a third-grader with Attention Deficit Disorder as I anticipated the inauguration of the Casa Acogida (“Hospitality House”). The house is a project that was four years in the making—an alternative to the substandard rooms (wooden walls and dirt floors) that elderly adults who come to my center often call home. Full of vivid colors and intricate ornaments, the house is a refurbished beauty that ten abuelos will eventually call their own. The only missing aspect of the project is a non-elderly resident in charge of the daily routine of the new community.
The Hogar de Cristo (“Christ’s Home“), the social service agency where I…

October 16th, 2002
Falling in Love and Serving the Poor in Latin America

When I first looked into her eyes, I fell harder for her than for anyone I had previously met. She had the most beautiful brown eyes, perfectly complementing her gorgeous smile and adorable features. I found myself constantly wanting to be near her, hold her, appreciate her company. I never expected such ridiculous circumstances to occur. I never imagined that I would travel thousands of miles, leaving my friends and family behind, to fall head-over-heels for a two year old.
Alison, however, embodied everything that made Nicaragua so captivating for me. I left the comforts of Xavier University in Cincinnati during January of my junior year completely clueless of what I had done. From the moment I stepped into…

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