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Edward Ortiz :
23 article(s)

Edward Ortiz is a journalist and writer from western Massachsetts.
March 2nd, 2002
A Bad Case of 'Sympathy Envy' for the USA

Could it be that the United States is suffering a severe case of “sympathy envy” these days?
Surely no other nation’s been too keen on the morality of U.S. war aims since it earned the honor of the first nation to use weapons of mass destruction on Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of World War II.
From the secret bombing of Cambodia during the Vietnam War to the leveling of poor neighborhoods in Panama City during the hunt for Manuel Noriega in 1989 it’s been one case of bullying after another. Nowhere has the playing field been remotely level (leveled is more like it).
Perhaps all the recent eavesdropping, browbeating, and bribing the U.S. is reportedly doing at the United Nations is a consequence…

February 28th, 2002

Will we ever know why the elder and younger Presidents Bush have such a fervent obsession with toppling Iraq?
Morally, can the United States government justify making war on the people of Iraq on the grounds that it possesses weapons of mass destruction when the U.S. is the only nation ever to have used the atomic bomb?
It all comes down to the laying out of a solid premise.
Every dramatist is familiar with premise. It’s the foundation of all good drama. It’s a surefire way of building something from nothing and having people buy into it. A solid premise can always be made into a well-made play. And a solid premise can always sell a war to the public.
So which premise is at play with the U.S. plan to invade Iraq…

February 16th, 2002

It was playwright Bertold Brecht who said that the only crime greater than robbing a bank was founding one. Brecht must have been thinking of powerful and cunning individuals like Enron chairman and CEO Kenneth Lay when he said that.
Lay, who drew a salary and compensation package of nearly $42 million in 1999, and other top-level executives at Enron, recently cashed in a lucrative bag of stock options before the bubble burst on the company’s troubled scheme of investments.
For Lay the take was a cool $150 million. No doubt, every Ponzi scheme organizer and rapacious con man must be red with envy. But anger, not envy, is needed here.
Sure, Enron employees who saw retirement accounts disappear faster than a…

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