busted halo annual campaign
Busted Halo
author archive
Julianne Wallace :
42 article(s)

Julianne E. Wallace is the associate director of faith formation, worship, and ministry at St. Bonaventure University in Western New York. She earned an M.T.S in Word and Worship from the Washington Theological Union in Washington, D.C. and a B.A. in Music Performance from the University of Mary Washington in Virginia. Julianne is passionate about sharing the joy of liturgy with others and helping everyone to worship well.
March 24th, 2013
A guide to the three-day celebration of the Church

The Triduum (TRIH-du-um) is the time of the Church year when we celebrate the passion, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. This three-day celebration begins with the Holy Thursday Mass and continues on Good Friday with the Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion. At the end of this liturgy, we leave the church in silence, waiting to celebrate the glory of our Lord’s resurrection. Then, on Saturday at sun down, the Church re-gathers to celebrate the final, and most grand, moment of the Triduum: the Resurrection of our Lord.
The Triduum is somewhat like a three-day prayer marathon, and if you are a novice there may be some rituals that are unfamiliar to you. This guide will help you walk and pray through the liturgies…

August 21st, 2012

There is not a specific place where a manger scene should be placed. The only guideline is that the Manger Scene should not be placed directly in front of the altar (off to either side of the Altar would be fine). However, if the Church is exceptionally small and the manger can only fit in front of the altar, an exception can be made.…

August 14th, 2012

While the Deacon has the responsibility in the Mass to do some proclamations, (for instance, he says, “Let us give each other of sign of that peace,” or “The Mass is ended…”) the proclamation “Let us proclaim the Mystery of Faith” is in the Eucharistic Prayer. The priest should be the only voice heard throughout the Eucharistic prayer.…

August 7th, 2012

First and foremost, we must have a little patience and understanding. Although having crying babies and noisy children at Mass is distracting, it is also important to welcome all to the Table of the Lord — no matter how quiet or noisy a person may be.
If this is a particular problem at your Church, you may investigate the Cry Room. For instance, if there is one at your Church you can make sure it is properly stocked and supplied for all a parent needs. The Cry Room should also be somehow connected to the worship space, so parents who are trying to worship can still celebrate with the gathered community. Finally, if you are willing to go the extra mile, consider volunteering some of your time in the cry room at a Mass,…

July 31st, 2012

There are many places in the United States that you can study to be a liturgist! First, you can look into doing a Certificate in Liturgical Studies. Most Graduate Theology Schools (Graduate Theological Union, Catholic Theological Union, and Notre Dame, for example) have programs that you can complete to get a Certificate in Liturgical Studies. If you are looking for a more serious program, I’d suggest starting an MA or PhD program in liturgical studies. Most major Catholic institutions have such a degree program, including the schools mentioned above as well as Catholic University and St. John’s College. If you are just fresh out of high school and interested in becoming a liturgist, I’d suggest starting…

July 24th, 2012

When a deacon is present at the Celebration of the Eucharist, he has some special duties that he is responsible for. These duties include proclaiming the Gospel (and possibly the homily), praying the General Intercessions, assisting in the distribution of Communion, and carrying out other liturgical duties as necessary. So although at World Youth Day there were tons of priests that could have proclaimed the Gospel, it is the rightful duty of the deacon to do so, if there is a deacon present at the Mass.…

July 17th, 2012

All the precious blood must be consumed after Communion- no matter how much is left (see the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy #279).
That said, one Eucharistic Minister should not be consuming large quantities of the precious blood as the effects of the wine will inebriate them, so they should drink as much as possible and then ask another Eucharistic Minister to finish what remains.…

July 3rd, 2012

For this answer, we look directly to the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy #279:
“The sacred vessels are purified by the priest, the deacon or an instituted acolyte after Communion or after Mass, insofar as possible at the credence table. The purification of the chalice is done with water alone or with wine and water, which is then drunk by whoever does the purification. The paten is usually wiped clean with the purificator.”
In common English, when you go to purify the chalice, you’ll put a little bit of water in the chalice, swish it around and then drink whatever is left in the chalice.…

May 29th, 2012

According to the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy (nos. 328-29), all vessels should be made of precious metal; or, in the case of the United States, a durable material such as an ebony or hard wood. The reason why glass is discouraged is because glass can break very easily, and the sacred vessel should not be so fragile. However, despite the fact that glass is not mentioned as a suitable material for the Chalice, you will see some churches using glass for the sacred vessels.…

May 22nd, 2012

“And with your spirit” is the new way of saying “And also with you.” For a good explanation of the difference see this article about the Top Five Liturgical Changes (hint: “And with your spirit” is 1!).…

May 15th, 2012

Each liturgical season has a special color assigned to it that determines what color the priest and deacon’s vestments are and also to determine how the church is decorated. Here is a basic list of the colors:
White: White is used for all the feast days and during the Christmas and Easter seasons.
Red: Red is used on Palm Sunday, Good Friday and Pentecost. It is also used when we celebrate the feast day of a Martyr.
Green: Green is the color of ordinary time.
Violet or Purple: Purple is used for both the Advent and Christmas seasons.
Rose: Pink (or Rose) is used only twice in our liturgical year, on Guadate and Laetare Sundays.…

April 23rd, 2012
What are the various parts of the priest’s outfit?

Ordinarily in the Mass, the priest wears three types of sacred vestments:
Alb: This garment is common to both ordained and instituted members of the Church. The Alb is a long white garment that is worn over ordinary clothing. Often, a cincture is used around the waist so that the alb can fit properly.
Chasuble: This is a vestment that comes in many colors and the priest wears the particular color of the liturgical season. The Chasuble is worn over the alb and stole.
Stole: The stole is worn by the priest around his neck. It is a long, narrow rectangular vestment that will also bear the color of the liturgical season. (Please note: a stole is also worn by the deacon, but he wears it across his chest.)
For more information on…

April 10th, 2012

Who picks the music at Mass varies from place to place. In some parishes, there is a special liturgy committee that helps select the music for worship. In other parishes, the responsibility is left up to the music director. Almost always, the pastor has at least some input on what music is sung at the Mass. If you are interested in finding out how it is done at your Church, just ask the pastor or music director- they should be able to answer your question. For more information on how music is selected see here.…

April 3rd, 2012

College Students (and really, anyone) should attend a worshipping community where they can feel welcomed, inspired and challenged. The proximity of this community does not matter (that is, unless it is 100 or more miles away!). So the simple answer to your question is no, you do not have to stay at your local parish when you go off to college, but you can stay at your local parish if it is a community that feeds your spiritual needs and is fairly easy to get to!…

March 20th, 2012

Holy Water is found at every Church entrance-no matter where in the world you may be! It is holy because it has been blessed by a priest. We, as Catholics use it to bless ourselves by dipping our fingers in it and making the sign of the cross as we enter into the Church. This action is a reminder of when we were blessed with the Holy Water at our Baptism. We also use Holy Water in the Sprinkling Rite- which we most often celebrate during the Easter season.…

March 13th, 2012

The amice is a piece of rectangular cloth with two thin-longer strands on either side (to be honest- it kind of looks like an apron!). The amice used to be a mandatory liturgical vestment before the Second Vatican Council. Priests would put the amice on over their shoulders. The alb would then go over the amice. Now, the use of the amice is only required if the alb does not fit properly over the priest’s clothes.…

March 6th, 2012

A purificator is a small square piece of cloth, with a cross in the center, that is used during the Liturgy of the Eucharist.
Specifically, Eucharistic Ministers who distribute the Blood of Christ use the purificator to wipe the chalice clean between each use. Purificators are also used at the end of Communion to purify or clean the sacred vessels.…

February 28th, 2012

The corporal is a small square piece of white cloth that is placed on top of the altar during the Liturgy of the Eucharist. The paten and chalice are placed on top of the corporal for the Liturgy of the Eucharist.…

February 21st, 2012

Bringing up the gifts at the offertory is a great ministry mainly because it is so simple—there is no training needed. And as for actually getting to participate sometimes you just have to be at the right place at the right time! In most parishes, an usher or Mass Coordinator will flag down someone as they are walking into Church and ask if they would be interested in bringing up the gifts. There are some parishes that have sign-up sheets in the Parish Center or at the front of the Church. If this is the case, all you have to do is sign-up for a particular Sunday (and don’t forget which Sunday you signed up for!). Finally, if you still have not found a way to bring up the gifts just ask your Pastor. He will know exactly who you…

February 15th, 2012

A purificator is a small square piece of cloth, with a cross in the center, that is used during the Liturgy of the Eucharist. Specifically, Eucharistic Ministers who distribute the Blood of Christ use the purificator to wipe the chalice clean between each use. Purificators are also used at the end of Communion to purify or clean the sacred vessels.…

Page 1 of 3123
powered by the Paulists