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Julianne Wallace :
42 article(s)

Julianne E. Wallace is the associate director of faith formation, worship, and ministry at St. Bonaventure University in Western New York. She earned an M.T.S in Word and Worship from the Washington Theological Union in Washington, D.C. and a B.A. in Music Performance from the University of Mary Washington in Virginia. Julianne is passionate about sharing the joy of liturgy with others and helping everyone to worship well.
February 7th, 2012

The word liturgy has developed over many years. In classical greek, leitourgia is a work done on behalf of the people. In ancient times, any work that was done by someone for the good of the community could be considered a leitourgia. In the early church, liturgy referred to both the people involved in ministry (church officials) and the actual act of worship (see the New Dictionary of Sacramental Worship for more on this). If you want to read up on the most-up-to-date definition of liturgy, I’d suggest consulting the Constitution on Sacred Liturgy the Second Vatican Council. While the Council Fathers do not give a specific clear-cut definition of the word, this Constitution does provide us with many images and…

January 23rd, 2012

We all know the drill. We should go to Mass on Sunday. We should go to Mass on Holy Days. And really, in general, we should worship God more in our daily lives.
Now, consider this: stop “shoulding on yourself.” In a recent column Fr. Jim Martin, SJ, wrote that if we are too busy focusing on what we “should” do, then we miss out. When we are too busy worrying about whether we should be in the pew — we are actually missing out on engaging in the worship experience. So skip the “shoulds” and get right to worship. Don’t just think you should go to Mass more. Don’t just try to go to Mass more, be more involved in the worship experience.
Ways to worship well
Here are three ways to help you stick to worship:
Find your…

January 10th, 2012

The best way to become a lector is to either talk to your pastor or talk to the person in charge of the Lector ministry in your parish. I suggest that you go to the parish website or the parish bulletin to find the correct contact information. Once you get in touch with the Coordinator for your respective ministry, you will probably have to do specialized training (but don’t worry — it won’t be too involved).…

January 5th, 2012

A Call to Worship is the moment at the beginning of prayer or Mass when someone calls us together and centers us as a community. The Call to Worship usually takes the form of a welcome to the entire parish community. Sometimes birthdays, anniversaries or other special events are announced. And finally, in some parishes, the Call to Worship is a tool to help us remember that as we celebrate the Mystery of the Eucharist, we are always in God’s presence.
Not every parish uses a Call to Worship at the beginning of mass or at a prayer service. Those that do, have found it to be helpful in reminding the community that this is a special time where we come together to pray.…

December 6th, 2011

No! This is a common misconception about the 3rd Edition of the Roman Missal. The new missal is not better than the words we have been praying for 40 years…it is just a different way to pray. How is the new missal different? A different tool was used for translation from the original Latin text. In the 1975 Sacramentary (the book we previously used), translators used a tool call Dynamic Equivalence, which focused on translating the meaning of a phrase. In the 3rd Edition of the Roman Missal, translators used Formal or Direct Equivalence, which translates word-for-word from the original Latin text. Neither form of prayer is better or worse than the other. And finally, neither one is an incorrect way to pray —…

November 22nd, 2011

Every Mass that we celebrate is directed by the Bishop whether the Bishop is there in person or whether he has appointed a priest to celebrate the Mass (General Instruction for the Roman Missal #92). When the Bishop is present at the Mass, he will often preside over the entire Liturgy. In the event he does not preside for the entire Mass, he will at least preside over the Liturgy of the Word and give the Final Blessing. There are special procedures regarding what to do when a Bishop is present at Mass. The most visible procedures will be regarding the bishop’s mitre and crozier (two of the Bishop’s liturgical regalia). Throughout the Mass, there are times when the Bishop will need to wear his mitre and hold his crozier…

November 16th, 2011
The new translation of the Mass is coming to a parish near you. Here are the changes you need to know about.

If you’re headed to Mass during the upcoming Advent and Christmas seasons, you’re going to notice some changes. Starting November 27 the Roman Catholic Church will be using a new set of instructions for celebrating Mass — all part of the newly revised Roman Missal (the 3rd Edition, in fact!). This new translation contains revised prayers for both the priest and the assembly. Don’t worry, not all the prayers are changing, but there are some significant changes you should know about.
#1: “And with your Spirit!”
At the beginning of Mass, the priest makes the Sign of the Cross and greets the people by saying, “The Lord be with you.” In the new translation, the assembly…

November 15th, 2011

The Gloria and the Creed are reserved for our most solemn holy days, which includes the Sunday Celebration of the Eucharist and any other holy days in the Church (including Solemn Feast Days). The General Instruction of the Roman Missal (nos. 53 and 68) states that the Gloria should always be sung (or said) on Sundays (except during the seasons of Advent and Lent). The Creed should be said or sung at all Sunday celebrations and solemnities. Why is this the case? The Gloria and the Creed are not necessary for a celebration of the Mass, and indeed are ornate ways to express the faith that we believe. Therefore, we reserve these beautiful expressions for our most solemn and festive occasions.…

November 7th, 2011

The USCCB has released a statement regarding flags in Church. Officially, there are no rules regarding state or national flags in the Church and the USCCB leaves it to the local bishop’s discretion on when, or if, to display flags in Church. Remember , in the Liturgy, we celebrate the living, dying and rising of Christ and all the symbols present in our Church and sanctuary lead us deeper into this Paschal Mystery. The presence of a national or state flag does not lead us deeper into the Paschal Mystery of Christ and therefore, its presence in the worship space should be strongly discouraged. At funerals, when a US Flag drapes the coffin, the Rite of Christian Burial says that any flag displayed over the coffin must…

October 25th, 2011

Two things to keep in mind if you want a singing assembly: 1) musical repertoire and 2) musical leaders. In choosing music for Mass, we must be sure that is easy enough for the assembly to sing. If you choose a piece that is technically challenging, then the assembly is more likely to listen rather than participate. One great way to get an assembly singing is to do dialogical, or call and response, music. Dialogical singing involves a cantor or choir singing a phrase and then the assembly singing another phrase in response to the cantor/choir. Dialogical music invites the assembly to join in the singing and places some responsibility on the assembly to keep the song going. Hymnody is another great way to get assemblies…

October 18th, 2011

Standing together after the reception of Holy Communion is a sign of unity that we are truly the Body of Christ, which we have just received. However, in the General Instruction of the Roman Missal, there are no specific guidelines for a posture after the reception of Holy Communion. There are posture guidelines for the Eucharistic Prayer leading up to the reception of Holy Communion, however, there are no guidelines mentioned for what the assembly should do after they receive the Body and Blood of Christ. There is one note in the Roman Missal that is helpful for us in determining what our posture should be: “With a view to a uniformity in gestures and postures during one and the same celebration, the faithful should…

October 11th, 2011

Question: Regarding candles…what’s the proper rubric regarding lit and unlit candles on the altar?  (e.g.  Lit by the ambo at liturgy of the word and extinguished when lit of Eucharist starts?  None lit on the altar until liturgy of Eucharist?  Any lit by the Blessed Sacrament?)
The General Instruction of the Roman Missal outlines just a few norms for the use of Candles in the Celebration of the Mass (See nos. 117, 133, and 307). First, candles should always be used in the Entrance Procession and there must be at least two candles lit at every Mass. These candles must be placed on or by the Altar during the Entrance Procession and then, at the time of the Gospel Acclamation, the candles are processed,…

October 5th, 2011

With the implementation date for the third edition of the Roman Missal just a few months away, (the First Sunday of Advent, November 27, 2011), NOW is the time to start preparing communities for the transition. In order to make the transition easier for the people in the pews, catechesis on the new texts should begin, at the latest, in October. There are a plethora of resources available to help you educate parishioners about the textual changes in the Roman Missal. Listed below are just a few websites that provide catechetical resources for the transition. I also highly recommend the following blog post from PrayTell author, Diana Macalintal, entitled “Using the Homily to prepare for the Roman Missal.” Included…

October 3rd, 2011

The main option for the “Blessing of Animals” comes from the Book of Blessings (which is available in your nearest sacristy as well as from Liturgical Press). The blessing is composed of a Liturgy of the Word and then a Blessing over the Animals. If you are looking for something a little more creative, look into some writings from St. Francis of Assisi, whose feast day we celebrate when we bless the animals. His Canticle of the Creatures is a great prayer to either pray aloud or sing (there are many versions of this song—you many know one version as All Creatures of Our God and King). One tip to keep in mind: if you are going to bless many animals, you may want to keep the service short because things could get a little…

September 6th, 2011

In the 3rd edition of the Roman Missal, the Penitential Rite has now become the Penitential Act. In this reconciliatory action, there are a couple of very noticeable changes to the Confiteor (the old and new text of the Confiteor are below). First, instead of saying the phrase, “I have sinned greatly through my own fault,” we will now pray, “I have greatly sinned.” The second change occurs later in the Confiteor when the faithful pray, “through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault,” while striking their breast. To some, the revised prayer may appear to focus on our own sinful nature too much. The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops reminds us that, although at this point…

August 23rd, 2011

In the Mass, the entire gathered assembly celebrates together with the priest (or prayer leader). Since the whole community celebrates together, the term “celebrant” is not the best way to describe the role of the priest in the Mass, because it sets the role of the priest against the role of the rest of the assembly (if we say that the priest is the only celebrant—what about the assembly?) Some liturgical texts use the term “priest-celebrant” which indicates the special role of the priest within the celebrating community. However, the term “presider” best describes the role of the priest in the Mass. A presider is someone who is called forth from the community to be a leader of prayer and to be…

August 10th, 2011

On August 15, we celebrate the Assumption of Mary. For the celebration of the Mass, the most common things we can do is pray the propers from the Roman Missal and use the readings for the Assumption Mass. You can also select music that is that is both Marion (but be careful not too make every hymn you sing a Marion hymn-we must also keep in mind that we are celebrating the Paschal Mystery of Christ as well!) Having a wonderful homily can also help the assembly to understand the feast better. In addition, you can set the worship space up differently so that, when people come in, they can see that there is something special about this day. Adding flowers to the worship space or changing the colors of the Altar linens and other…

July 5th, 2011

The Rite of Ordination occurs within the context of Mass and therefore there will be some parts of the sacrament that will be familiar to you. Also, if you have participated in any of the sacraments recently you will notices some similarities in the Ordination Rite.
The sacrament itself occurs in between the Liturgy of the Word and the Liturgy of the Eucharist. The Bishop, who is the presider (or leader) of the celebration will examine and question each candidate for ordination, much like you might see at a Baptism, Confirmation or Wedding.
Another moment that will be familiar to you is the singing of the Litany of Saints; however, during this litany the candidates lie prostrate before the altar as the community asks…

June 28th, 2011

There are several church documents that provide guidelines for Church Musicians. For a general guide on liturgy and music you can refer to Chapter VI of the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy. More recently, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops published Sing to the Lord, a document that provides musical guidelines for parishes and Church Musicians. For more information about these documents and other guidelines see the National Association of Pastoral Musicians website. There you can find all the necessary materials for planning and selecting music for worship.…

June 24th, 2011

Lectors should be properly trained to not only READ the Word of God, but also PROCLAIM the Word of God…and a few simple steps can prepare your lectors for proclaiming the Word from the highest hill-tops!
The simplest way to prepare Lectors for worship is to give them the scripture reading in advance. Scheduling lectors so they know when and what they are reading is a great first step for an effective lector ministry. Second, it is helpful for readers to have a Lector Workbook along with their assigned scripture reading. This workbook provides the Sunday readings, a pronunciation guide and often a commentary on the readings for the lector. Such Lector guides are available through Liturgy Training Publications.…

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