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Our writers invite you along on their journeys through Lent. Follow the play-by-play of their personal spiritual practices and share your own.

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March 16th, 2014

LOUIS: DAY 12 — Do You “Take Sundays Off” in Lent?

 
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8700135389_7bf55b3a82_oNow, before I get going on this I want to say that I’ve heard it go both ways, and I’m definitely not saying that mine is 100% right. Ok? Here goes: I don’t take Sundays off in Lent. I’m sure some of you already know exactly what I’m talking about, but for those who don’t, basically what I mean is this: if you take a simply mathematical look at the span of time between Ash Wednesday and Easter, you come up with 46 days, not 40 (maybe 47, depending on how you count days, but either way, definitely not 40.) This has been frequently treated as a reason to take Sundays “off” from your Lenten sacrifice, as Sunday is typically a day of feasting rather than fasting.

But I don’t do that. “Why?” you ask… well, the short answer is I was raised that way (which may be the short answer for why many of us practice the way we do, but that’s an issue for another day.) The longer, though still somewhat short, answer basically boils down to the following– I feel that if you’ve committed to doing something special for Lent, you shouldn’t just ditch that because you can. Instead, I find it more rewarding not to go out of my way to take Sunday off, but rather to keep at my Lenten sacrifice as I would any other day. That said, I don’t think it’s wrong to use Sundays as a break; it’s just not the way that I do things.

How about you? Do you “take off” Sundays in Lent or observe your typical sacrifice anyway? Why? Feel free to let us know in the comments!

 
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The Author : Louis Sullivan
Louis Sullivan is from New Jersey and a recent graduate of Fordham University where he majored in English and theology. He was an active member of Fordham’s Campus Ministry as a Eucharistic Minister, lector, and member of the liturgical choir. Louis is a writer for Dark Knight News and publisher of From the Batcave. Louis is also an intern at Busted Halo.
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Please note that the editorial staff reserves the right to not post comments it deems to be inappropriate and/or malicious in nature, as well as edit comments for length, clarity and fairness.
  • avnrulz

    We never took Sundays off during Lent. My Irish parents wouldn’t, why should we?

  • Kelli McIlnay

    I don’t take Sundays off. Growing up we were always told, if Jesus can go through the wilderness for 40 days going without, then die on the cross for our sins, the least we can do is follow through with our sacrifices during Lent. Now I guess that goes back to how I was raised. It’s how I’m raising my son and how he’ll probably raise his kids, too.

  • Michelle Jones

    Sundays “during Lent” are celebrations and what we called “little Easters”. I put during Lent in quotes because Lent is 40 days and Sundays are not considered part of it. Also, I believe that you do not fast in the presence of the King (which is where you go on Sundays). That’s my reasoning and what I was taught and so no, I do not fast on Sundays.

  • Joanie Twomey-Shook

    I used to always take Sundays off. In fact, last Saturday night (which, I rationalized was my “Sunday” since we attend the Saturday night vigil each week) I had a “tall” Starbucks latte (which I rationalized was a sacrifice down from my grande latte). But…then I realized that my twin six year old daughters can’t take a day off from their sacrifice…which is not to suck their thumbs. That would be tantamount to me only drinking booze on Sundays–I’m an alcoholic in recovery. Yes, theirs was the same kind of addiction. So…during the week, I sacrifice for God…on Sundays, I’ll sacrifice for God AND my kids :)

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