Busted Halo

It’s time for another bracket! This time we’re listening to and voting on Christmas songs. Listen, vote, enjoy!

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December 21st, 2013

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There we have it ladies and gentlemen, your 2013 Christmas Songology winner…Josh Groban’s O Holy Night.

Thanks for participating. We wish you a continued happy Advent, a merry Christmas and an upcoming great new year!

December 20th, 2013

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We’re down to the final matchup and it’s no surprise that it’s the Classics region versus the Religious region as It’s a Wonderful Life‘s Hark! The Herald Angels Sing takes on Josh Groban’s O Holy Night. 2 songs enter, 1 song leaves. It’s time to listen and vote on last time…

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Hark! The Herald Angels Sing

O Holy Night by Josh Groban

Hark! The Herald Angels Sing was written in 1739 by Charles Wesley, and was originally performed with a slow and somber tone, unlike the joyful and upbeat way it is often heard today, like in this iconic last scene from the 1946 classic It’s A Wonderful Life.

O Holy Night, a well-known traditional carol of the season, was composed in 1847 and happens to be the second piece of music ever broadcast on the radio in 1906.…

December 19th, 2013

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We’ve arrived at the final four where we find a No.1 seed (Hark! by George Bailey & friends) versus a No.8 seed (Christmas Time is Here ala Snoopy) and a No.5 seed (Josh Groban’s O Holy Night) facing off against a No.7 seed (Little Drummer Boy by duo Crosby and Bowie.)

The biggest shock yesterday is Ella Fitzgerald losing to Christmas Time is Here. How classy, elegant and beautiful sounding Ella lost to the now overplayed, perhaps belongs-in-Christmas-song-jail (or at least probation,) is anyone’s guess.

Listen, enjoy, vote!

(Note: Two of these songs require you to sign up for a free Spotify account in order to listen to them.)

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Hark! The Herald Angels Sing

Hark! The Herald Angels Sing was written in 1739 by Charles Wesley, and was originally performed with a slow and somber tone, unlike the joyful and upbeat way it is often heard today, like in this iconic last scene from the 1946 classic It’s A Wonderful Life.

Since 1965 Christmas Time is Here has been a perennial hit just like the television special it was written for, A Charlie Brown Christmas.

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O Holy Night by Josh Groban

December 18th, 2013

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And Rudolph goes down! Welcome to Round 3 of Christmas Songology, the holiday bracket contest where you get to finally help decide what the best Christmas song is. George Bailey and friends and family completely outmatched Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer 67% to 33% in the votes yesterday with their rendition of Hark! The Herald Angels Sing. Other big percentage wins included Josh Groban’s O Holy Night over Andrea Bocelli’s Adeste Fideles (62% to 38%); The First Noel over Away in a Manger (65% to 36%); Ella Fitzgerald over Elvis Presley (68% to 32%); Little Drummer Boy over The Twelve Days of Christmas (63% to 37%); and the Grinch over the Pogues’ remorseful yet fun, heartfelt, romantic Christmas ballad, Fairy Tale of New York, with a whopping 74% to 26%.

Today offers some good as well as some strange matchups, the most exciting of which might be No.1 and No.2 seeds in the Classics region going head-to-head with Jimmy Stewart vs. James Taylor. The Zany region continues to be appropriately named as No.1 seed, The Grinch, takes on No.7 seed, David Bowie and Bing Crosby’s Little Drummer Boy, (arguably the worst song left in this …

December 17th, 2013

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Welcome to Round 2 of Christmas Songology, where you get to listen to, vote on, and ultimately declare which of these songs is the very best Christmas tune out there. Depending on your tastes, yesterday saw some of the very worst (or best) Christmas songs get knocked out of the running as both the Trans-Siberian Orchestra and Mannheim Steamroller were eliminated by the No.1 and 2 seeds in the Classics region.

However, in our humble opinion, three really, really good Christmas songs (and all No.2 seeds) got the boot in Round 1 (Jingle Bells, Christmas (Baby Please Come Home), Holy, Holy, Holy), not to mention Mariah Carey’s Joy to the World (No.3) and Sting’s I Saw Three Ships (No.4) which all just prove nothing more than we aren’t that good at seeding these things for our audience. But seriously, did anyone take the time to listen to Esquivel!’s Jingle Bells? It’s by far more superior, not to mention a lot more fun, than that Crosby/Bowie garbage and deserved better than it got. (By the way, unless you’re voting ironically, we hope you actually listened to Little Drummer Boy and found something you …

December 16th, 2013

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Busted Halo® is giving you an early Christmas present this year: a bracket contest where you get to listen to, decide and vote on which Christmas song you think is best. It was hard narrowing it down to just 32 selections since there are so many songs out there, not to mention honing them down to some of our favorite versions from some of our favorite artists. What we ended up with is a great mix of classics, religious, more modern, and a miscellaneous category that we just ended up calling “zany”. So take some time to listen and compare, and then cast your vote in this first round to begin decorating the Christmas tree with the best Christmas songs.

(Note: Many of these songs require you to sign up for a free Spotify account in order to listen to them.)

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Hark! The Herald Angels Sing as performed in It’s a Wonderful Life


Deck the Halls by Mannheim Steamroller

Hark! The Herald Angels Sing was written in 1739 by Charles Wesley, and was originally performed with a slow and somber tone, unlike the joyful and upbeat way it is often heard today, like in this iconic last …

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