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April 14th, 2009

Faith, spirituality and religion are too often looked upon as the province of “experts” who spend all their time in places of worship. At BustedHalo.com we frequently hear from readers who desperately want to explore their spiritual questions but feel alienated from traditional faith communities. The fact is that our experience of sacredness is as unique and personal as our fingerprints, but we sometimes fail to recognize these moments as God’s way of speaking to us in our everyday lives.

“Where’s God?” chronicles the countless different ways people experience transcendence. In episode #2 Ph.D. student Tara Good describes her experience of God outside the walls of church.

We encourage readers to share their own experiences with us at: editor@bustedhalo.com

Originally published May 29th, 2007

April 13th, 2009

princessspeaks-inside

Thinking about getting married? Engaged? Welcome aboard the emotional rollercoaster: Planning a wedding and anticipating a marriage is a joyful time of preparations — but also a highly charged period of decisions, debates and family pressures.

And, as usual, BustedHalo® is here to help. Recently, I joined forces via the wonders of iChat technology with Father Eric Andrews, a Paulist priest who has over 15 years of wedding experience. Fr. Eric and I answer questions from brides and grooms preparing to be married in the Catholic Church. Why can’t you get married on the beach? Why is the priest being such a jerk? Why do we have to talk about sex during pre-Cana?

In our video series, The Princess, The Priest and the War for the Perfect Wedding, I advocate for the brides and grooms. With a Ph.D. in social history, four years of writing the Pure Sex, Pure Love column and a recent wedding under my belt, I’ve got both professional and personal expertise in this area. And Fr. Eric represents the clergy with honesty and humor, as he explains why he’d rather do a dozen funerals than one wedding.

Don’t believe us that there’s a culture war between engaged couples and the Church? Think of this scenario:

After you’ve called your parents and celebrated with your intended, your next step is that first phone call to your church. You want to set a date, and get the ceremony lined up, so that you can start the real work of booking the reception hall, the music, the flowers and the guest list, right?
Let the war begin
It’s at this moment that the cultural war begins: As a bride or a groom, this is the biggest day of your life — and you’ve got lots of specifications. You might have a color scheme in mind, or have your heart set on a particular song for the processional. You’re dreaming of the perfect event — at just the right time, in just the right setting, with everything going perfectly.

Well, here’s the thing: Getting married is …

April 13th, 2009

princesspriest_400px

Episode #2 “The Jerky Priest!”

Dr. Christine B. Whelan, is an Iowa-based social historian, professor, journalist and author. She is the author of Marry Smart: The Intelligent Woman’s Guide to True Love, and Why Smart Men Marry Smart Women.

Fr. Eric Andrews CSP is the pastor of Blessed John XXIII parish, which serves as the Catholic campus ministry for the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Prior to entering the priesthood, he worked for Jim Henson and the Muppets on a variety of television productions.

April 12th, 2009

Return to the Lent calendar.

Easter

John 20:1-9

On the first day of the week,
Mary of Magdala came to the tomb early in the morning,
while it was still dark,
and saw the stone removed from the tomb.
So she ran and went to Simon Peter
and to the other disciple whom Jesus loved, and told them,
“They have taken the Lord from the tomb,
and we don’t know where they put him.”
So Peter and the other disciple went out and came to the tomb.
They both ran, but the other disciple ran faster than Peter
and arrived at the tomb first;
he bent down and saw the burial cloths there, but did not go in.
When Simon Peter arrived after him,
he went into the tomb and saw the burial cloths there,
and the cloth that had covered his head,
not with the burial cloths but rolled up in a separate place.
Then the other disciple also went in,
the one who had arrived at the tomb first,
and he saw and believed.
For they did not yet understand the Scripture
that he had to rise from the dead.

Thank you for participating in Busted Halo’s FastPrayGive Lent Challenge.

Share yourstruggles at our “Slip Support Station” on Facebook.

To see a list of the winners, click here.

Return to the Lent calendar.

April 11th, 2009

Return to the Lent calendar.

Holy Saturday/Easter Vigil

We celebrate the Easter Vigil after sundown on Holy Saturday. We start with the church in darkness, and then slowly the introduction of light makes its way into our presence by lighting candles from the great Easter candle (Paschal candle), and as Jesus’ resurrection grows stronger, more light opens into the congregation.

The evening is also marked by the Baptism of the elect, those who have been preparing to enter into the church. Those of us not being baptized are called to renew our own baptismal promises as well.

Fast from impatience.

Pray for the patience to accept Christ’s coming into your life. (If that seems too abstract to you, pray for a greater sense of hope and love in your life.)

Give yourself time to decide where you would like to donate the money in your FastPrayGive Bowl. (Your FastPrayGive Bowl is a container you’ve set aside to hold the money saved from various fasting challenges, to be used for whatever charity you choose at the end of Lent.)

Slipped up? Don’t give up. Start again and share yourstruggles at our “Slip Support Station” on Facebook.
Today’s prize is: a tin of Busted Halo M&M’s

To see a list of the winners so far, click here.
To win today’s prize: Give us your name and email address along with the email address of one friend you’d like to introduce to BustedHalo.com® (or now, you can put your name in both spaces) using the form below by 3 a.m. EST tonight. (We will, in turn, send them one email asking them to register for our Busted Halo® weekly email updates. We do not SPAM people nor do we share our email lists with any third parties. Read contest rules here.)

Return to the Lent calendar.

April 9th, 2009

rocking-chairinside

I love rocking chairs. Whenever I go on retreat, as I did last week, I hope that they have a rocking chair at the retreat house. Generally, when I am rocking away I do not have a care in the world. But during my recent retreat my soothing rocking chair experience was ruined when I began contemplating Good Friday.

Quite frankly, I hate Good Friday. It’s dreary and dark. There’s the cross and the blood and the whipping and the people calling for Jesus to die. There’s the lance through Jesus’ side and the falling on the road and the Pietà, where Jesus’ body is handed over to his mother, Mary — what torture for any mother to see her son like that!

No, Good Friday is not a comfortable wooden rocking chair kind of day. It is an uncomfortable wooden cross kind of day.

Maybe that’s why our pews are uncomfortable most of the time. Hard wooden benches build character, or at least that’s what the nuns used to tell us in Catholic school. And perhaps they were right. Because if I can’t be uncomfortable while looking at the cross on Good Friday — then why should I ever look at it? Why should I ever look and see that Jesus died for us and know that he died not merely for our sins but rather because God decides to love us despite them?

Jesus ends up on that cross because he loved too much. He loved the lepers and the poor and that woman caught in adultery. He ate with sinners; and those he held in greatest esteem, his friends, all left him when the going got tough. Only Peter was brave enough to get all the way to the high priest’s courtyard. And even with all of that bravery, Peter denies he even knows him.

That scary cross

That scary wood of the cross… Peter was afraid of it too. He knew the cross is where he would end up if he admitted to being one of Jesus’

April 9th, 2009

Return to the Lent calendar.

Good Friday

We’re letting you see Good Friday early, so you can be prepared to observe what we’re asking of you.

“Were you there, when they crucified my Lord?”

The haunting sounds of this old spiritual tell you all you need to know about Good Friday. This is the day of Jesus’ crucifixion and death. Jesus was nailed and hung on a cross and left for dead with common criminals on either side of him. There is no Mass celebrated on Good Friday. The Blessed Sacrament is removed from the tabernacle and moved to an alternate location in the church.

The day is marked by an interactive reading of the Passion narrative. The congregation usually reads the lines in the story of the shouting mob who called for Jesus to be put to death. This reminds us that we are all complicit in Jesus’ death — it is our sins that have crucified Jesus. God offers himself as a ransom for all.

The cross is also venerated on this day, meaning parishioners come forth and kiss or touch the cross as a sign of both respect and a willingness on our part to accept the cross as the only means to resurrection.

Good Friday marks the crucifixion and death of Jesus and is the most solemn day of the year for Christians. Throughout the past 40 days we’ve been encouraging each other to continue practicing the ancient spiritual disciplines of Lent — fasting, prayer and almsgiving — in both big and small ways that challenge us in our daily lives. For this solemn day we ask you to try the biggest spiritual challenge of all, by fasting from all food and all electronic media for the day except for what’s absolutely required. (NOTE: if you have health issues that have nutritional implications or work obligations that can’t be avoided, find a way to fast safely within your limitations! DO NOT PUT YOURSELF IN DANGER!)

Fast from all food and all electronic media for the

April 9th, 2009

Return to the Lent calendar.

Holy Thursday

Two things are central to Holy Thursday. First, we are reminded of the Last Supper and the final period of time that Jesus shared with his disciples.

In three of the four gospels we hear about how Jesus took bread and broke it and blessed a cup of wine saying “this is my body; this is my blood. Do this to remember me.” In the Gospel of John however, the central moment of Jesus’ final evening with his disciples is not the Eucharistic meal (which in fact is not even mentioned) but rather, the washing of the disciples’ feet. This moment get re-enacted at Mass after the homily and also reminds us of the second thing that gets emphasized on Holy Thursday: the institution of the priesthood.

Jesus commissions His disciples to continue the ritual they share at the Last Supper and he tells the twelve gathered there that whenever two or more are gathered in His name, He is there present among them. Our priests today offer that same ritual, the sacrifice of Christ himself every time they celebrate mass. Tonight we recall that first Eucharist and are grateful to our priests who continue this saving work for all of us.

Make sure to check out Good Friday now!

Fast from pride.

Pray for humility and to contemplate Christ’s washing the feet of his disciples.

Give $10 for those less fortunate to your FastPrayGive Bowl. (Your FastPrayGive Bowl is a container you’ve set aside to hold the money saved from various fasting challenges, to be used for whatever charity you choose at the end of Lent.)Make sure to check out Good Friday now!

Slipped up? Don’t give up. Start again and share yourstruggles at our “Slip Support Station” on Facebook.
Today’s Prize is: a copy of The Green Bible

To see a list of the winners so far, click here.
To win today’s prize: Give us your name and email address along with the email address of one friend you’d

April 8th, 2009

5wayseasterinside

My freshman year of college I was irate. After twelve years of Catholic school I expected some sort of vacation at Easter. My secular college however had no intention of living up to that expectation. It was eye opening that first year to realize that, not only was there no vacation, no one even acknowledged that Easter was on its way.

In high school, Easter had always been a time to celebrate. (If nothing else, to celebrate the end of Friday fish fry lunches.) On Easter morning, following a huge post-church family brunch, I remember gorging on chocolate bunnies (especially their ears), Reese’s Peanut Butter Eggs, PEEPs and other assorted sweets, usually giving myself a stomach ache as I cast off the forty-some days of sacrifice I had endured.

But in college no one cared what I gave up for Lent, and when I told my friends of my plan to go home for Easter Sunday, they thought it seemed “extreme.”

Easter didn’t matter; and as my college years continued, it mattered less and less to me. Without a vacation I found myself knee deep in homework, rehearsals, meetings, and everything else that consumed my college life. I was “too busy” to celebrate the holiday, and my Easter activities devolved into mindless sugar consumption and occasional PEEP jousting bouts during study breaks.

What’s remarkable is that this was also the experience of most of my friends. Although Christmas is held inviolate, Easter truly defines our faith and yet it seems to be shuffled in among the less important holidays that survive only to boost sales revenues.

Yet, Easter doesn’t have to be just about chocolate rabbits, marshmallow chicks and jelly beans. Even without a vacation, there are ways to make Easter a memorable holiday. After some informal polling, here are five easy suggestions my friends and I came up with to make your Easter …

April 8th, 2009

Return to the Lent calendar.

Lenten Fact

Passover is the first of three major festivals that have historical and agricultural significance. It is the beginning of the harvest season in Israel although nobody really pays any mind to this. The Hebrew word Pesach means to pass through or exempt. The Passover recalls the biblical story from the book of Exodus. God passed over the houses of the Jews that were marked with the blood of the lamb when he was slaying all the first born sons in Egypt.

Jews remove all leavened bread from their homes for Passover to symbolize that they were once nomadic and always in a hurry — so much so that they couldn’t let their bread rise.

On the first night of Passover, there is a special family meal called a Seder. Many scholars believe the Christian Last Supper was a seder meal although this is disputed by others. The word seder means “order” — there is a specific set of information that must be discussed in a specific order throughout the meal.

Jews retell the story of the Exodus, often in song, and many blessings and symbols of the bitterness of slavery (eating bitter herbs) are sprinkled throughout the meal. Children play a major role in the meal, asking how this night differs from the usual weekly Shabbat meal and finding the hidden matzoh. This serves a practical purpose as well as a religious one — the meal is long and children may fall asleep if they are not engaged.

The closing prayer expressed the hope of celebrating next year’s Passover in Jerusalem (meaning that the Messiah will appear.)

Fast from solitude. Make plans to share a meal today.

Pray for our Jewish brothers and sisters this Passover. We are all spiritual Semites.

Give by reaching out to a family member or friend.

Slipped up? Don’t give up. Start again and share yourstruggles at our “Slip Support Station” on Facebook.
Today’s Prize is: a copy of the March issue of Magnificat with the

April 7th, 2009

Return to the Lent calendar.

Lent QuotableThere is a place where thou canst touch the eyes
Of blinded men to instant, perfect sight;
There is a place where thou canst say, “Arise”
To dying captives, bound in chains of night;
There is a place where thou canst reach the store
Of hoarded gold and free it for the Lord;
There is a place — upon some distant shore —
Where thou canst send the worker and the Word.
Where is that secret place — dost thou ask, “Where?”
O soul, it is the secret place of prayer!— Alfred Lord Tennyson

Fast from ignorance. Read a book.

Pray for people who lack a proper education.

Give used books to a library or a literacy organization.

Slipped up? Don’t give up. Start again and share yourstruggles at our “Slip Support Station” on Facebook.
Today’s Prize is: Halo Store Grab bag

To see a list of the winners so far, click here.
To win today’s prize: Give us your name and email address along with the email address of one friend you’d like to introduce to BustedHalo.com® (or now, you can put your name in both spaces) using the form below by 3 a.m. EST tonight. (We will, in turn, send them one email asking them to register for our Busted Halo® weekly email updates. We do not SPAM people nor do we share our email lists with any third parties. Read contest rules here.)

Return to the Lent calendar.

April 6th, 2009
modernslavery-logo
There are more slaves today than at any other point in human history.
— E. Benjamin Skinner, A Crime So Monstrous
For most of us, it’s difficult to imagine that in 2009 there are more than 27 million people, most of them women and children, being held against their will. Many are abused or carried across international borders and exploited as servants, forced prostitutes or laborers. Many of them never make it out. If they do, it’s not unusual that they no longer possess their sense of humanness or the will to continue living.

Busted Halo’s three-part series on modern-day slavery and human trafficking aims not only to raise consciousness and concern about these two incredibly important human rights issues, but also to move readers to action.

Leslie Hughes and Molly Donahue pose with <br>the African children following the rescue.<br>Photo courtesy of Molly Donahue.
How a group of Kentucky eighth graders freed child slaves in Africa
In February 2007, Leslie Hughes’ reading class debated over an annual service project. The eighth graders at St. Joseph’s School in Crescent Springs, Kentucky, said, “Mrs. Hughes, we know you’re not our project leader, but do you have any ideas?”

Hughes did. She had just seen a television report on the atrocities happening to hundreds of children in West Africa. Fishermen in the region recruit children who live in outlying villages — toddlers to teenagers — by convincing families that their children will move away to learn a skill. Instead, the fishers abuse and exploit the children. For filling shifts of up to 18 hours in decrepit canoes on the dark, deep waters off Ghana’s coast, the fishermen feed the children one daily meal. Under their masters, many of these children suffer regular beatings, rape, malnutrition, and muscularly disproportionate bodies due to constant swimming and rowing. Some witness the …

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April 6th, 2009

loveindownturn-imag

This morning, I appeared live on “The Early Show” on CBS to discuss dating and relationship strategies during an economic downturn. Watch the show here and read below for more advice.

When is the appropriate time to bring up finances in a relationship — and is it something you should really be asking about early on?

Money is one of those subjects that’s off limits on the first date — but if you’ve just been laid off from your job there’s no avoiding the discussion. Get to know someone for who they are, not what they can buy for you: Is she proactive about finding a new job? Is he brainstorming about other career paths? Ambition and perseverance are what’s going to pay off in the long term.

Of course, as the relationship gets more serious — especially if it’s heading toward marriage — then it’s time to put your cards on the table. When you get married, their debt becomes your debt.

There are websites like creditscoredating.com that match people based on their credit scores — suggesting that people are being very cautious about their financial relationships. Is something like this a good option?

People generally look for someone who is like them — shared values, shared faith, similar educational background — and your credit score speaks volumes about the financial choices you’ve made in your life: Someone who is careless about money tends to think about short-term benefits, not long-term future planning.

But dating isn’t about comparing résumés or credit scores. It’s about getting to know who someone is in real life, not just on paper.

Still, 20 million Americans are using online dating — and most sites report increased traffic in the last six months. This is consistent with what we saw during the downturn in 2001, as well. Online dating can be cheaper than the bar scene, and at a time when money is scarce and job prospects are uncertain, most of us don’t want to go through these tough times alone.

April 6th, 2009

Return to the Lent calendar.

Lenten FactHot cross buns are a British Catholic tradition. Despite an attempt by Queen Elizabeth I to squash this papist pastry in the 1500s, it has survived down through the centuries.

The ironic thing about its perceived Catholicity is that the hot cross bun started as a pagan offering. When the Saxons settled in England in the 6th Century, they brought their Germanic gods with them from Holstein. Eostre was their goddess of light, whose festival occurred at the beginning of Spring. Eostre herself likely derives from the Vedic deity Ushas, the pre-Hindu Indian goddess of dawn, which welcomed the birds and drove off evil spirits. Ushas is further developed in the vedas as the medium of awakening in people, illuminating the way to Truth.

Ushas -> Eos -> Eostre is also the root of the word Easter, and one of the ways Saxons honored Eostre was to bake little spiced buns with a cross or X on them representing the four seasons or four phases of the moon. Christians absorbed hot cross buns, along with other aspects of the Spring festival, into Easter, turning the cross on top into a symbol of the crucifixion.

The main thing to keep in mind about hot cross buns is that while they are delicious, they aren’t supposed to be overly sweet. Here is a simple recipe for classic hot cross buns. It involves some kneading and it would help to have some experience with baking, to know when the dough is ready, but it’s pretty easy. So, this Good Friday or Easter, consider making hot cross buns, or at least pick some up at a local bakery.

Hot Cross Buns

4 teaspoons active dry yeast
1 cup warm milk (115°)
2 tablespoons softened butter
2 eggs
8 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 cups

April 5th, 2009

Return to the Lent calendar.

Today we celebrate Passion (Palm) Sunday. We receive palms at Mass in memory of Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem where he was hailed by the people with palm branches.

As he enters Jerusalem, Jesus moves closer to his death on the cross. So these palms symbolically point us toward not merely Christ’s death but also His resurrection.

Another lesser-known reference to palm branches is in the book of Revelation, where it speaks of the saints in heaven “wearing white robes and holding palm branches in their hands.” (Revelation 7:9)

The palms suggest that they too are triumphant over death and have come to live in a new life with God. The white robes also remind us of our Baptism, of which we are constantly reminded throughout Lent.

Palm Sunday is a time of great hope in the Resurrection, that while Jesus is accepting his cross soon, the implement of his death will also become a symbol of new life for centuries to come.

Fast from unwelcoming behavior. Take your headphones off and talk to someone. Make small talk with a cashier. Ask someone how their day is going.

Pray for people who suffer from loneliness.

Give a call to someone who you think needs a friendly word.

Slipped up? Don’t give up. Start again and share yourstruggles at our “Slip Support Station” on Facebook.
Today’s Prize is: copy of the March issue of Magnificat with the Lenten Companion

To see a list of the winners so far, click here.
To win today’s prize: Give us your name and email address along with the email address of one friend you’d like to introduce to BustedHalo.com® (or now, you can put your name in both spaces) using the form below by 3 a.m. EST tonight. (We will, in turn, send them one email asking them to register for our Busted Halo® weekly email updates. We do not SPAM people nor do we share our email lists with any third parties. Read contest rules here.)

Return to the …

April 4th, 2009

Return to the Lent calendar.

Lent QuotableIt is every man’s obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it.— Albert Einstein

Fast from excessive electricity consumption.

Pray for people in the world who don’t have the infrastructure to have electricity.

Give $2 to your FastPrayGive Bowl. (Your FastPrayGive Bowl is a container you’ve set aside to hold the money saved from various fasting challenges, to be used for whatever charity you choose at the end of Lent.)

Slipped up? Don’t give up. Start again and share yourstruggles at our “Slip Support Station” on Facebook.
Today’s Prize is: Halo Store Grab bag

To see a list of the winners so far, click here.
To win today’s prize: Give us your name and email address along with the email address of one friend you’d like to introduce to BustedHalo.com® (or now, you can put your name in both spaces) using the form below by 3 a.m. EST tonight. (We will, in turn, send them one email asking them to register for our Busted Halo® weekly email updates. We do not SPAM people nor do we share our email lists with any third parties. Read contest rules here.)

Return to the Lent calendar.

April 3rd, 2009

photofinishYou’ve made it this far — only another week to go.  As a matter of fact, it’s the Holiest Week of the year.

So even if you’ve completely messed up all throughout Lent, here’s a good opportunity to try again and get into the spirit of Holy Week.  Remember this is unflunkable — with each day that passes you get one more chance to learn more about yourself and grow closer to God.  So join us down the homestretch for your last chances to fast, pray and give one day at a time.
 
We aren’t announcing when we will be doing our FastPrayGive Lent Incentive Grand Prize Drawing, but we will clue you in: we’ll do it in time to get the iPod Nano Easter Basket to the winner for Easter Sunday.
 
So, to give you a little incentive to get back on board, we’ve decided to extend our email amnesty offer — to make it easier than ever to enter the drawing. For the next week — 4/3/09 – 4/11/09 — you can enter your own email on the contest form in both spaces asking for an email address once per day until the FastPrayGive Lent Incentive Grand Prize Drawing. (Remember we aren’t announcing when we will be doing our drawing but we will do it in time to get the prize to the winner for Easter Sunday). Each day’s entry will count as two more chances to win the Nano. (Of course, you can enter a friend’s email if you want.)
 
Just make sure to go to the each day’s new entry in our FastPrayGive Lent Calendar and enter your own email address in both parts of the form.

April 3rd, 2009

Return to the Lent calendar.

Lent QuotableIf we’re not willing to settle for junk living, we certainly shouldn’t settle for junk food.— Sally Edwards

Fast from any food that is cooked or processed (e.g. french fries, rice, bread, cooked vegetables).

Pray for the well-being of our environment.

Give the money you would’ve spent on processed foods to your your FastPrayGive Bowl. (Your FastPrayGive Bowl is a container you’ve set aside to hold the money saved from various fasting challenges, to be used for whatever charity you choose at the end of Lent.)

Slipped up? Don’t give up. Start again and share yourstruggles at our “Slip Support Station” on Facebook.
Today’s Prize is: bag of Busted Halo Swedish Fish

To see a list of the winners so far, click here.
To win today’s prize: Give us your name and email address along with the email address of one friend you’d like to introduce to BustedHalo.com® using the form below by 3 a.m. EST tonight. (We will, in turn, send them one email asking them to register for our Busted Halo® weekly email updates. We do not SPAM people nor do we share our email lists with any third parties. Read contest rules here.)

Return to the Lent calendar.

April 2nd, 2009

princesspriest_400px

From over-the-top registries to destination weddings, the American wedding industrial complex is a $161 billion consumer bonanza. But a wedding is more than just a party: It’s the beginning of a life-long marriage, an important sacrament in the Catholic Church. Brides want everything to be to their specifications — and priests bristle at being treated like hired help. Friends and family ask about color themes for the reception, and the priest plies pre-Cana compatibility quizzes. It’s a cultural war, and engaged couples are on the front lines.

What happens when the princess planning her “one perfect day” clashes with the priest who would rather preside over a dozen funerals than one wedding?

Find out in the new BustedHalo.com series, “The Princess, The Priest and the War for the Perfect Wedding.” Send in your questions to weddings@bustedhalo.com and hear Dr. Christine Whelan, author of the Pure Sex, Pure Love column go head to head with Father Eric Andrews, a Paulist priest with more than 15 years of wedding experience as they debate your questions: Why can’t you get married on the beach? Why is the priest being such a jerk? Why do we have to talk about sex during pre-Cana? And many more.

Want to see more? Watch other episodes of “The Princess, The Priest and the War for the Perfect Wedding” here.

Dr. Christine B. Whelan, is an Iowa-based social historian, professor, journalist and author. She is the author of Marry Smart: The Intelligent Woman’s Guide to True Love, and Why Smart Men Marry Smart Women.

Fr. Eric Andrews CSP is the pastor of Blessed John XXIII parish, which serves as the Catholic campus ministry for the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Prior to entering the priesthood, he worked for Jim Henson and the Muppets on a variety of television productions.

April 2nd, 2009

Return to the Lent calendar.

Lent QuotablePrayer is the key of the morning and the bolt of the evening.— Mohandas Gandhi

Fast from sensory overload. For one hour use neither your sight nor hearing. (Use a blindfold or earplugs.)

Pray in thanksgiving for the gifts of sight and hearing and pray for those who are blind or deaf.

Give some of your time to an organization for the blind and deaf (like Lighthouse International or Recording for the Blind )

Slipped up? Don’t give up. Start again and share yourstruggles at our “Slip Support Station” on Facebook.
Today’s Prize is: Halo Store Grab bag (one of the following-The Apostles by Pope Benedict XVI, A New Heart-Eleven Qualities of Holiness by Robert Morneau, Letters to Exodus Christians by Edward Hays, Unlikely Ways Home by Edward L. Beck, Charles de Foucauld by Robert Ellsberg, Holy Eros — Pathways to a Passionate God by James D. Whitehead and Evelyn Eaton Whitehead, Solitude and Compassion-The Path to the Heart of the Gospel by Gus Gordon, Living with Wisdom—A Life of Thomas Merton by Jim Forest, Christ in the Margins by Robert Lentz and Edwina Gateley.)

To see a list of the winners so far, click here.
To win today’s prize: Give us your name and email address along with the email address of one friend you’d like to introduce to BustedHalo.com® (or this week only, put your name in both spaces) using the form below by 3 a.m. EST tonight. (We will, in turn, send them one email asking them to register for our Busted Halo® weekly email updates. We do not SPAM people nor do we share our email lists with any third parties. Read contest rules here.)

Return to the Lent calendar.

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