Busted Halo
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December 19th, 2004
BustedHalo speaks with the nun who changed the Catholic Church's teachings on anti-Semitism.

Sitting in her wheelchair and tethered to a constant supply of oxygen, 84-year-old Sr. Rose Thering doesn’t exactly fit the image of a righteous crusader for change. But this Dominican sister who challenged the Catholic Church’s long-held teachings regarding the Jewish people has been an unlikely hero in the decades-long struggle to change Catholic attitudes. Through her doctoral research, which played a pivotal role in Vatican II, and her activism since then, this diminutive nun from the Midwest has been instrumental in officially changing the Catholic Church’s position on its relationship with Jews and reversing the Church’s teachings that blamed Jews for the death of Jesus.…

April 20th, 2002
Wishing you many happy years together...

Mike and Marion Perracchio pronounced their wedding vows at 11 a.m. on Saturday morning, April 20th, in New York City. Their column will be returning soon, but here are a few wedding photos:…

January 18th, 2002
A conversation with the former nun and author of The Tulip and the Pope

BustedHalo: If there were only one question I could ask you, it would be what you meant by “Faith is partly a matter of humbly applied wit.”
Deborah Larsen: What a great question. I meant that, while faith is a gift (as everything is a gift), it is also nurtured by thought—using one’s wits—about the mysteries that inhere in and surround that Presence which we call God. Reading, studying, prayer, meditation, talking to others—all of that is using one’s wits, which means doing actual hard work as well as disposing yourself to moments of grace. And I just think a humble or an open heart, as opposed to an arrogant one, is what’s required for any growth in faith. The humble…

January 13th, 2002
A conversation with the author of An Infinity of Little Hours

BustedHalo: Nancy, your book, An Infinity of Little Hours, is an extraordinary look at life inside a Carthusian monastery, something no one has ever done before. The reason you were able to do it is that you have an unusual connection: you are married to a former Carthusian monk—one of the five monks whose experiences you chronicle in the book. So let’s begin at the beginning: how did you two meet?
Nancy Klein Maguire: I was teaching at Loyola University in Chicago and the other woman on the faculty—it was 1967 and there were only two of us—was asked to look out for an ex-Carthusian who had just left the monastery . She said to me, let’s go have coffee with this young man and see if he needs help adjusting. So she…

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