Busted Halo
 
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October 1st, 2008
A BustedHalo® Guide to Being a Faithful Citizen

There’s no better place to start at this time in history than with the upcoming election and moreover, the issues that Catholics are most concerned about. Catholics are never single-issue voters and this guide will help Catholics in forming their consciences during election season to make the best possible choice they can make keeping their faith in mind alongside their political decisions.

September 30th, 2008
How Would Jesus Handle the Financial Crisis?

Quick! Grab every man, woman and child! The end is near! The sky will come crashing down upon us unless (that is), the bailout bill is passed.

Sure, this might be a slight exaggeration, but it is how some lawmakers in congress interpreted the plea by Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson for support of his $700 billion economic rescue plan.

September 29th, 2008
Paranormal State's investigator talks about God, Catholicism and the spirit world

Channel surfing on a Sunday afternoon, I stumbled upon a show I hadn’t seen before: A&E’s docudrama series Paranormal State.
All right, I thought. It’s kind of like the Sci Fi Channel’s Ghost Hunters, and a little like The Travel Channel’s Most Haunted. I like it.
But it was really the show’s 26-year-old star, Ryan Buell, who caught my attention. I watched as he made the sign of the cross, prayed, invited a priest to bless the house, and gave its owners a couple of blessed medallions. The show’s religious turn kept me fixed in my seat.
Is he for real? I asked myself. To find out, I tracked him down and spent some time chatting over the phone.
The Birth of Paranormal State…
“Can you hold on a sec?”

September 25th, 2008
A Jewish Mother Thinks About the Value of Religious Education

My nine-year-old son, Josh, is not interested in learning Hebrew or in having a bar mitzvah. The bar mitzvah, a Jewish ritual when a boy turns 13, is the transition from childhood to “manhood” that involves reading from the Torah in Hebrew before the entire congregation.
“You didn’t have one, Mom,” he emphasizes. I explain that in the 1970s girls often didn’t have a bat mitzvah…, the female version, especially if they were cultural, secular Jews who didn’t belong to any temple. Ironically, it is my parents, his grandparents, who are adamantly attached to the idea of a bar mitzvah for my boy.
“I hope I live to see Josh read from the Torah,” says my 85-year-old dad, repeating his litany. These are people

September 22nd, 2008
My technicolor memories of Yankee Stadium

My Little League team ended their season with a trip to go see the pros in action. My parents were never ones for traveling outside our suburban city limits and so this would be my first Major League Baseball game. Growing up as a Mets fan, I was upset that my first game would be at the hated Yankee Stadium…

September 22nd, 2008
A Young Mother Thinks About Love, Sex, Marriage and What To Tell Her Daughter

The sun pouring through the high window of my dorm at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was a baptism of sorts, drenching me in my twin bed in slits of light…

September 3rd, 2008
Marc Adams Video Blogs from the RNC and speaks with a young delegate about the mixture of politics and religion.

Contributing Editor Marc Adams Video Blogs from the RNC and speaks with a young delegate about the mixture of politics and religion.…

September 2nd, 2008
Why John McCain’s running mate has changed the game

While watching Barack Obama’s speech at the Democratic National Convention on Thursday night, my conservative-leaning heart sank a little. “There’s no way,” I thought, “McCain will ever out-charisma this guy. And who’s he going to pick for V.P. that would garner any real coverage or excitement? Pawlenty? Romney? Capable politicians yes, but…(yawn).”
The next day, when Senator McCain named Gov. Sarah Palin as his choice for Vice President I felt kind of giddy.
Real surprises in political campaigns are a rarity. But Sarah Palin is the unexpected plot twist in a movie where you thought you knew everything that was going to happen.
As someone who’s gotten…

August 29th, 2008
Marc Adams Video Blogs from the DNC and speaks with an Arab-American delegate from Democrats Abroad.

Contributing Editor Marc Adams Video Blogs from the DNC and speaks with an Arab-American delegate from Democrats Abroad.…

August 27th, 2008

Contributing Editor Marc Adams Video Blogs from the DNC and speaks with Politico.com’s Chief political writer Mike Allen.…

August 23rd, 2008
Decades after he gave the Illinois senator his first job in community organizing, Jerry Kellman talks about Obama, his own religious conversion and both men's approaches to creating change

In the early 1980s, when Jerry Kellman interviewed a young, idealistic Ivy League graduate for a $10,000 a year job with Chicago’s Developing Communities Project (DCP) he had no way of knowing it would be a meeting that would follow him for the rest of his life. Now, nearly 25 years later, he is frequently asked to speak about Barack Obama’s tenure as a community organizer and how it shaped the candidate’s sense of himself and the world. What many people miss, however, is how both men’s sense of faith has fundamentally altered the way they see the world.
While Obama and Kellman eventually moved on from DCP—each because they felt that community organizing was not effective enough to solve…

October 24th, 2007
A Pure Sex, Pure Love Special Edition

Ladies, it’s that time of year to let out your inner vixen and to live out your fantasies of being a naughty nun. Guys, it’s your time to sit back and gawk.
It’s Slutoween.
Go to any Halloween store and you’ll see that scary has been replaced by sexy: Women (and girls) will be dressing up as sexy kittens, sexy stewardesses, geishas, naughty rag dolls and the like. For the men, however, there are no parallel pool boy costumes or naughty fireman uniforms. (A new industry someone might want to start? But I digress.)
The articles about the slutification of Halloween are in full force again this year. Most people are upset about it — feminists decry that women are allowing themselves to be…

January 19th, 2006
John Paul II gave us a moment that we need to remember

When Pope John Paul II’s would-be assasin, Mehmet Ali Agca, was released from a Turkish jail last week after serving almost 25 years behind bars — except for the complete transformation of his hair from jet black to grey—the man who emerged looked strikingly similar to the person who inhabits one of the more enduring images that I hold dear of the late pope. In that scene John Paul is huddled in a corner talking quietly at close range with the man who tried to kill him. It was an extraordinary act of forgiveness that continues to be extremely rare—if not unheard of — on the world stage and one I don’t remember nearly enough in my own life.

After Agca shot John Paul II six times at close range while thousands of pilgrims looked on in St. Peter’s Square, people around the world were shocked. “Who would want to kill a Pope?” was the question on many people’s lips. “He should get the chair,” my mother remarked angrily. And we all agreed.

Breaking the endless cycle

It was an understandable reaction. Think about it, how often do any of us forgive or ask forgiveness for the many comparatively small transgressions in our own lives? How often in our history books, filled with accounts of hatred and violence, do we come across unpredictable acts like this that break the endless cycle of vengeance? Months after his recovery, the Pope’s visit to his attacker in prison was a radical step in a different direction. He looked at his would-be killer in the eye, conversed with him, shook his hand, and even prayed for him!

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