Busted Halo
feature : word on ths street
February 11th, 2008
Word on the Street : Sacrifice

“What does the idea of sacrifice mean to you?”

Erica, 25
"Sacrifice is trying to give up things that give you pleasure in the name of God. This year I'm trying to give up salt because I always put it on my food and salad."
Annette, 39
"Sacrifice is giving up something that hurts you and is hard for you to give up. People stop smoking, they go on diets, all the things you said you would do for New Years'-this is your chance to do it. I'm not going to go give up anything, but I am going to start coming to church more often."
Robert, 44
"The sacrifice of Lent is a recognition of our sinful nature, a sort of a spiritual urging to do better and to the best we can to expiate sins from our lives. I am personally trying to improve my life my being more punctual and just generally more conscientious."
Susan, 44
"Sacrifice is giving up something that you think means something to you, but in reality it is something you can do without. I think that idea can spill over into deciding whether that thing is a bad habit, and hopefully realizing you thought it was important but it is not."
John, 22
"I think what it would take is an understanding that this thing that you are sacrificing doesn't define you. This is the start of lent, and I think of Jesus on the cross. The only way He was able to do what He did was the absolute assurance that He was indeed the son of God, and that the Father would raise him up. I think it takes that sort of fundamental faith to sacrifice anything."
Carlos, 42
"My sacrifice is to prove that I still believe in Him, and I am doing it in His honor, and therefore also for my own well-being."


 
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