Busted Halo
audio
BustedHalo Cast
Busted Halo® Cast
The Busted Halo Cast® is our weekly podcast that answers questions of faith ranging from the simple basics of the Catholic faith to complex dilemmas of everyday life. We also highlight a church to visit that other young adults have found welcoming and vital and preview next week's scripture readings.

Busted Halo’s Fr. Dave Dwyer, Fr. Steven Bell, and Barbara Wheeler-Bride co-host every week offering their faith-filled answers to your questions. You can call-in your questions to (917) 591 8476 or e-mail us at questionbox@bustedhalo.com

   Subscribe to Podcast (RSS) 
 
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail
January 16th, 2014

“How did the Gospel writers come to know the stories they wrote in the Gospels?” Question begins at 8:09. ‘Coming Attractions’ reads from the Gospel of John. ‘Church Search’ visits Richmond, VA.…

March 30th, 2012

#313-Why does Jesus seem grumpy in the Gospels?  Bonus question: what kind of tree was used to make Jesus’ cross?  Check out Virtual Stations of the Cross on BustedHalo.com.  03-30-12.…

December 1st, 2011

The Catholic theologian Gerald O’Collins, S.J., has called the writings of the prophet Isaiah “the fifth gospel.” By this he means that so many of the themes of the gospels, enfleshed in their portrayal of Jesus, have their scriptural beginnings in Isaiah. Isaiah’s connection to the story of Jesus seems particularly strong in the Advent and Christmas seasons. Even the prophet’s name — Isaiah means “Yahweh saves” — foretells the Christmas story.
The book of Isaiah is one of the longest books in the Old Testament and the writings within it were composed over a period of so many years that most scholars believe there were at least three “prophet…

December 12th, 2010
The only gift we can all afford this holiday season

We look to the holiday season to lift our spirits and yet come January we are sometimes utterly depressed because our expectations were not met. There is reason to hope despite our engagement in two wars (or, to be more exact, one war and one occupation); facing global financial insecurity because of corporate greed; people losing their homes to foreclosure; millions of others who have no medical safety net; still more who are homeless, hungry or living under brutal and repressive regimes in Africa and around the world. Despite all this and more, there is reason to hope as we embark on the holiday season. In the center of all of this, in the center of our lives as families, faith communities, neighborhoods —…

April 14th, 2010

Great question! For different people, obviously there will be different answers based on what inspires them and perhaps a personal preference for a particular kind of literature.
Since you asked me, I will say that I really can’t narrow down my choices to just one. The ones that inspire me the most are The Gospel of Luke and the Gospel of John in the New Testament. And in the Old Testament I’m a great fan of the WIsdom Literature: Ecclesiastes and Job as well as the book of Proverbs.
Perhaps, the last one I mention, Proverbs, is the one I’d be forced to take. After all, I know most of the stories in the Gospels and in the two Wisdom books I mentioned. But Proverbs provides us with age-old wisdom in the form…

April 14th, 2010

Great question! For different people, obviously there will be different answers based on what inspires them and perhaps a personal preference for a particular kind of literature.
Since you asked me, I will say that I really can’t narrow down my choices to just one. The ones that inspire me the most are The Gospel of Luke and the Gospel of John in the New Testament. And in the Old Testament I’m a great fan of the WIsdom Literature: Ecclesiastes and Job as well as the book of Proverbs. Perhaps, the last one I mention, Proverbs, is the one I’d be forced to take. After all, I know most of the stories in the Gospels and in the two Wisdom books I mentioned. But Proverbs provides us with age-old wisdom in the form…

January 26th, 2010
The renowned novelist and critic on Reading Jesus

Having spent more than three decades chronicling Catholic life as an author of novels, short stories, essays, memoirs and biographies, Mary Gordon decided to take what some might consider a radical leap for a Catholic: she actually read the bible. In Reading Jesus…, Gordon attempts to understand the rise of fundamentalism by engaging the Gospels herself as a reader. The volume that resulted from this challenge is a compelling blend of meditations, reflections and memories on her own faith life and the evolution of her belief. In the interview that follows, the Barnard professor reflects on the experience of truly reading — for the first time — stories she has heard her entire life, as well as her complicated

December 24th, 2009

Catholics differ from some Christian Churches which accept the Scripture as the only source of God’s revelation. Catholics have a strong belief in the truth of Scripture, but we also believe in tradition as a way in which God continues to reveal truth to us. Tradition can include beliefs, customs, prayers, and worship, the teaching of popes, bishops, theologians and Church councils. It’s our process of continually reflecting on the way in which the Word of God encounters our own experience as a community of faith.
Catholic understanding is that tradition includes the Scripture, and began before the gospels and letters were written. We do believe that Scripture is a unique revelation from God and…

August 28th, 2009

Dan Brown created quite a stir with his book The Da Vinci Code… and the resulting movie in which he purports that the Church has been covering up the marriage of Jesus and Mary Magdalene (as well as their offspring) in order to crush the “feminine divine.” Brown proposes that the basis for all of this is found in what he refers to as “numerous references” to Jesus and Mary Magdalene in apocryphal writings, particularly the apocryphal Gospel of Mary (Magdalene), which he claims the Church has been suppressing for centuries. In reality, there are very few references to Jesus and Mary Magdalene in these writings, all of which can easily be found on the Internet and in libraries. More importantly, none of the references

August 21st, 2009

Miracles require faith and faith has no proof. Catholic tradition holds that Jesus’ multiplication of the loaves and fishes (the only miracle told by all four Gospels: Mt 14:13-21; Mk 6:32-44; Lk 9:10-17; Jn 6:1-13) was indeed a supernatural event, revealing Jesus as the Bread of Life. In the Old Testament, God fed the Israelites in the desert with “bread from heaven” – manna (Exodus 16). It was believed that this miracle would be repeated by the Messiah (the anointed one) when he came. By multiplying the loaves (and fish), Jesus provides for the needs of the people as the Father once did. It is no surprise, then, that the people want to anoint Jesus as their king following this miracle. It is natural for us…

July 24th, 2009

Usually, we read a book by starting on page one and continuing through to the last page. Makes sense, right? Although we may be tempted to read the Bible in the same way, that’s not necessarily the best approach to reading the Bible. Why? Because the Bible is no ordinary book. In fact, it’s not a book at all…it is a collection of books: 73 in all! Think of the Bible as a library. It even has various sections to explore. In the Old Testament we have:
• the Pentateuch (Genesis-Deuteronomy),
• a History section (Joshua – 2Maccabees),
• a Wisdom section (Job – Sirach),
• and the Prophets (Isaiah – Malachi).
Likewise, in the New Testament, we have 4 “sections”:
• the Gospels (Matthew – John),
•…

May 18th, 2008

The Immaculate Conception is a teaching of the church that Mary, the Mother of Jesus, was preserved from original sin from the moment of her conception. This is not a teaching found in the New Testament, which contains no stories about the conception, birth or childhood of Mary. It developed in the Middle Ages, as a way of better understanding Mary’s special role as the Mother of God. It was finally declared to be a dogma of the Catholic Church by Pope Pius IX in 1854.
The feast of the Immaculate Conception of Mary is celebrated on December 8 and is one of the special holy days of the Church calendar. In the early 19th century the bishops of the United States declared Mary to be our patron under the title of the Immaculate…

May 18th, 2008

Jesus is very clear in the gospels that we can and should ask God to help us with our needs and that we can depend on God to respond. In fact, there are two prayers in the gospels that Jesus himself prays — and both contain requests of God. “The Lord’s Prayer” asks God to “give us the bread for this day,” to “lead us not into temptation,” and to “deliver us from the evil one.” And Jesus in the Garden at Gethsemane prays that God will “take this cup (his suffering and death) away from me.” In fact, neither of Jesus’ prayers was answered in the way he hoped. He was tempted, he was delivered into the hands of evil, and he did have to “drink…

May 18th, 2008
I don't know where to start. Should I start from Genesis and work my way through? I've read the majority of the new Testament and I've re-read some books. I know that when you read the Bible it's definitely not a one time read, I would like to find a way of reading it daily but I'm not sure how to go about it.

We have a great guide to reading the bible called Bible Boot Camp. You can find it by selecting Googling God in our top navigation, then clicking the Bible Boot Camp button.
I also think a good way to read the scripture is to read it along with the daily scripture offered at mass. One reading is usually from the old testament and the other is the gospel during weekdays. On Sundays, we get three bible readings: one from the old testament, one from the latter part of the new testament (usually one of St. Paul’s letters), and one from the Gospels (the story of Jesus).
Mike Hayes is Senior Editor for Googling God…

April 2nd, 2007
Was Jesus blindsided?

I envy those people who say that Jesus is their best friend.
I’ve never been able to understand how people are able to think of Him as My Buddy Jesus, confiding in Him like they would a best friend. I have no problem telling Him my innermost thoughts, but when it comes to receiving the satisfaction that one receives from sharing with a real best friend, I’m like the little girl who’s afraid of the dark. It’s not enough to know that God is watching over me; I need “God with skin on.”
Part of what was missing, I thought as I walked to the subway, was the feeling that Jesus could truly empathize with all my sufferings.
I knew He suffered more than anyone else ever has or will. Yet, it seemed…

powered by the Paulists