Busted Halo
Features
 
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail
April 4th, 2002

I knew a local cartoonist out in California named Paige Andersen, who one year near Election Day rendered drawings of improbable right-wing and left-wing extremists. I don’t remember the details. The right-winger was probably armed to the teeth, dispensing tax cuts as confetti, while the left-winger sported a pony tail and carried government cash ready to throw at any problem. I do recall that both drawings had arrows pointing to the respective extremist’s back pocket with the words, “Votes his pocketbook.”
As another election comes and goes, this part of the cartoon vividly comes back to me. It makes me wonder if polls ask the wrong question at election time. It may be we need to ask…

April 2nd, 2002

The edgiest character on TV these days is a sponge. He’s SpongeBob Squarepants and if you’ve never seen or heard of him, I strongly recommend you check out this creative, cutting-edge cartoon on the Nickelodeon cable network.
Before I explain why he’s so edgy, perhaps a brief introduction is in order, for those late arrivals to the Squarepants party. Allow me to loosely quote from his theme song: SpongeBob is a buck-toothed, rectangular-shaped character who “lives in a pineapple under the sea.” He’s “absorbent, yellow and porous,” and he fills his hometown, Bikini Bottom, with “nautical nonsense.”
SpongeBob’s pants are square,…

April 2nd, 2002
Enjoy The Da Vinci Code But Don't Believe It

Bookworm friends said they couldn’t put it down. More traditional Catholics excoriated it, calling it anti-Catholic. And good New York conspiracy nuts were declaring in the diner where I eat on Wednesday mornings that it was all absolutely true.
What could I do but read Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code ? Hungry reader that I am, I engulfed it. As a concerned priest?yet averagely gossipy and intensely skeptical person?I had a more complicated reaction to the book.
Can you keep a secret?
There are limits to what anyone can believe. The basic premise of Brown’s novel is that the clandestine Priory of Sion has been guarding the location of the Holy Grail in unbroken succession from the time of the Crusades…

March 29th, 2002
A Canadian View of Americans in the World

It was an early April morning when I awoke to the news that an American pilot had bombed a Canadian training exercise in Afghanistan and killed four Canadian soldiers. I sighed and prepared for the fallout.
It was quick. The killing was labeled ” friendly fire” and Canadian radio call-in shows and coffee shops exploded with angry debate. Canucks were mad; we helped those Yanks after September 11th and they thank us with death? No doubt, as Canadian bodies were flown home for funerals, more than one ?United We Stand’ bumper sticker was ripped from a Canadian car and dumped in the trash.
Oddly, I wasn’t angry. I wasn’t crushed, disgusted, or crazed. Instead, I was amazed. Amazed that…

March 28th, 2002
My List to Keep the Prez Busy After Saddam

One of my favorite buttons, which I attached to my backpack during my freshman year in college, was one that sported a photo of Frank Sinatra and read, “It’s Frank’s world; we just live in it.”
If I were sporting a button today, that button would read, “It’s the Dubya’s world–everybody else just lives in it.” With President Bush’s order to topple Saddam Hussein through “a comprehensive covert program” now out in the open, I’ve decided to add my two cents on other pesky world leaders we may want to topple:
1. Fernando Cardozo of Brazil – Should we ever face Brazil on the soccer field, it’s nice to know that we can save…

March 28th, 2002
How Baseball Keeps Teaching Me About Forgiveness

What does a sport of rich owners and multi-million dollar players teach us about forgiveness, that concept so near and dear to all Christians?
With baseball – plenty.
The three R’s
And the answer to why is as plain as the seed that groundskeepers spread in winter. Three concepts are crucial to making a baseball diamond fit for opening day?the three R’s?renovation, rejuvenation, and repair. In fact, read any book about baseball diamond groundskeeping and you’ll think you’re reading an inspirational book about the power of forgiveness?and what springs forth from it. Are not the three R’s foundations of forgiveness?
Listen to a fan of America’s pastime during the…

March 28th, 2002
A Generation of More "Realistic" Computer Games

Virtual AmericaConstruct your own “virtual neighborhood” where hundreds of clones of Sam Walton, Michael Eisner, and Rupert Murdoch compete inside a gated community. Play as one of the three and set sales quotas for products that an army of immigrants, who toil underground for minimum wage, will want to buy. Caution: not for sale in Mexican border towns.
BustedEstablish a thriving medical practice in breast enlargement. In timed relays you must discover new and expensive ways to create the “perfect breast”—one that defies gravity and time. Craft the perfect breast and win an all expense cyber trip to sunny Beverly Hills. But be careful: ruin a breast and you get sent to Grenada…

March 28th, 2002
Young People and the Catholic Peace Movement Today

As images of war fill a greater share of the nation’s TV news, many Catholics are tuning in to organizations like Pax Christi USA to uphold the doctrine of nonviolence. A peace movement of over 14,000 members and 140 U.S. Catholic bishops, Pax Christi USA is considered a crucial component of the global peace movement.
So how is Pax Christi USA organizing its efforts in response to current events?
Following is the first of a two-part interview with Johnny Zokovitch, program associate and youth outreach coordinator for the national organization.
Edward Ortiz: How do the rising numbers of young people currently signing up for the military affect your nonviolence outreach programs?
Johnny Zokovitch: While…

March 18th, 2002

It’s widely recognized that children who grow up in the midst of criticism tend to criticize others. Children raised with violence are at risk for perpetuating violence as adults. And children who grow up with experiences of sexual abuse are at greater risk for abusing another person sexually later in life.
Part of the human condition is that people who are hurt are vulnerable to acting out that hurt towards another person later on. It doesn’t mean they absolutely will, and most people go to great lengths not to pass on the hurts they endured. But it is a human vulnerability we need to understand well�especially in dealing with the current church scandal.
Shedding light on the dynamics of sex abuse…

March 17th, 2002
A Piper's Story on St. Patrick's Day

St. Patrick’s Day is not just a day to celebrate Irish heritage. As a bagpiper, St. Patrick’s Day explodes into an entire month of joining together with other pipers, playing parades and parties, and being in the center of cheering crowds. Every weekend brings us to a new town and new people, but always to the same big party.
For most people, pipers appear briefly in March, hang around for a few pints, and then disappear. Our days of celebrating our heritage are limited, like our days of celebrating our faith. Occasionally pipers return, to our weddings and funerals, but where are they in the “off season”? As powerful as this music is, you’d think we’d be heard more often!
So…

March 15th, 2002
Are the cookies the only thing not stale?

All hail that most American of snacks, the Girl Scout cookie, with its two vital lessons in capitalism: Pound on enough doors and your troop goes to Space Camp�or, send the sales sheet with Daddy to the office, and your troop goes to Space Camp.
God love those Thin Mints, but my troop barely left the I-275 beltloop of Cincinnati, let alone the atmosphere. Our cookie sales funded such activities as Beauty and Makeup Night�the marketing division hadn’t yet invented the splashy cookie box photos of Scouts rope climbing or careening past boys on dirt bikes�and summer day camps along the tributaries of the Ohio. At camp we engaged in such empowering activities as cleaning the outdoor latrines, a delicate…

March 9th, 2002

Quilts, like all big projects, eventually become metaphors. It’s no surprise; quilts, like life, are enormous undertakings that should only be started after much careful consideration and, possibly, alcohol. Certainly, I knew how much work would be involved in making my first quilt?my mother’s entire existence seems consumed by her passion for the art form?but I ploughed ahead anyway, without forethought, without booze. Quilting, I figured, is just time, patience, and effort. Surely, with my husband’s help, I’d pump out a blanket with energy to spare.
Steve knew better.
“You’ll have to measure a lot?and keep everything straight.”
“No problem. I…

March 8th, 2002
A Coming-of-Age Tale with Animated Catholic Villains

Catholic high school boys battle adolescent angst while devising pranks against authority figures in the imaginative, entertaining, and heartbreaking film, “The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys” (ThinkFilm).
This adaptation of the late Chris Fuhrman’s novel, directed by Peter Care, is a 70′s coming-of-age story about best friends Francis (Emile Hirsch) and Tim (Kieran Culkin), who struggle against the strict rules of their critical and moralistic teacher�the one-legged Sister Assumpta (Jodie Foster ).
Francis, a talented sketcher, creates an irreverent cartoon notebook; he depicts Sister Assumpta as Peg Leg, a wicked motorcycle-riding villain who’s out to destroy…

March 6th, 2002
And the Hard Questions

Who can blame those who lost friends and loved ones on 9/11 for thinking God let them down? And who can blame them for thinking that a benevolent and loving deity, if it exists, is not so benevolent and kind? And after all the falling concrete, steel, and blood, who can blame them for thinking that 9/11 proved once and for all that God does not exist?
I certainly can’t. If they all went running into a dark cave filled with the dust of doubt, I’d be there with them. For me the only thing that I know a year after 9/11 is that it happened. And that 9/11 begs a million questions.
Like a snake eating its own tail we were offered a glimpse of our own human horribleness on 9/11. And regardless of who is to blame it’s clear…

March 6th, 2002

Moments of extreme fear. We’ve felt them. Your life is hanging in the balance. And the outcome is anything but certain.
The seconds before your car hits another. Moments before the surgeon administers general anesthesia. Witnessing a violent crime.
Since September 11th, I’ve wondered with sadness what it was like to be a passenger in any of the four hijacked airplanes. To know that your plane�the one you’re on�is being hijacked. And it’s not clear you’ll ever see your family again, walk in the sand, celebrate another Christmas.
During those last few minutes of life, many probably knew intuitively they wouldn’t make it. Was the experience profoundly lonely? Was…

March 2nd, 2002
A Bad Case of 'Sympathy Envy' for the USA

Could it be that the United States is suffering a severe case of “sympathy envy” these days?
Surely no other nation’s been too keen on the morality of U.S. war aims since it earned the honor of the first nation to use weapons of mass destruction on Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of World War II.
From the secret bombing of Cambodia during the Vietnam War to the leveling of poor neighborhoods in Panama City during the hunt for Manuel Noriega in 1989 it’s been one case of bullying after another. Nowhere has the playing field been remotely level (leveled is more like it).
Perhaps all the recent eavesdropping, browbeating, and bribing the U.S. is reportedly doing at the United Nations is a consequence…

March 2nd, 2002
Sex Abuse in the Church

The other day a priest I know, wearing his roman collar, was walking down the street in Manhattan. A mother and her toddler child were heading in the opposite direction. When she saw my friend, she grabbed her child’s hand and pulled him close, away from the approaching priest. It was a nearly automatic reaction, he told me. Not hard to understand at all, a sign of the times even, but certainly demoralizing.
Clergy sex abuse has been in the news for weeks now. All over the nation, bishops have been removing priests (and most recently themselves) from ministry on account of past accusations.
There have been denunciations, calls for Cardinal Law’s resignation in Boston, demands that priests be removed,…

March 1st, 2002
Film Review: Signs

“There are two kinds of people in this world,” says Graham, the ex-Episcopalian priest played by Mel Gibson in Signs, the new thriller from Sixth Sense director M. Night Shyamalan. There are those, the widower and former clergyman means to say, who see the signs of a Higher Power at work in the world and those who don’t.
“Which are you?” That is the big question for Graham, his brother Merrill, his young children, and each of us sitting in the audience.
It’s a bizarre proposition, a otherworldly film (a la The X-Files ) literally about giant etchings in the corn crops that explores the idea of whether or not the Man Upstairs (as my grandmother used to say) is looking after us or…

February 28th, 2002

Will we ever know why the elder and younger Presidents Bush have such a fervent obsession with toppling Iraq?
Morally, can the United States government justify making war on the people of Iraq on the grounds that it possesses weapons of mass destruction when the U.S. is the only nation ever to have used the atomic bomb?
It all comes down to the laying out of a solid premise.
Every dramatist is familiar with premise. It’s the foundation of all good drama. It’s a surefire way of building something from nothing and having people buy into it. A solid premise can always be made into a well-made play. And a solid premise can always sell a war to the public.
So which premise is at play with the U.S. plan to invade Iraq…

February 18th, 2002

Kandahar captures what every U.S. radio, television and print journalist has been trying to make come to life for Americans over the past four months.
If you’re like me, you’re a kind of numb to all the media coverage of the plight of the Afghani people by now, and yet, Afghanistan and its people still seem like a far away and remote place.
But Iranian-born Mohsen Makhmalbaf’s recently released film “Kandahar” is a beautiful movie that succeeds in piercing a numb U.S. heart long enough to connect with the distinct personalities and dreams of the film’s characters.
Filmed before Sept. 11, “Kandahar” tells the timely story of Nafas (played by Nelofer Pazira),…

powered by the Paulists