Busted Halo
Features
 
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail
June 14th, 2008
Tim Russert (1950-2008)

“When he saw those values reflected back to him in the people he came across like the Jesuit priests who taught him, his dad’s drinking buddies or Senator Moynihan who he once worked for, Russert drew a clear line tracing it all back to his father’s living room in Buffalo.”

June 12th, 2008
“Wives, obey your husbands?”

As someone who studies the family and relationships, I usually look forward to the discussion of these big, important issues in the liturgy. At one church I attended during childhood summers, fathers would be recognized on Father’s Day by standing up and receiving applause. At another church, I remember mothers receiving a special blessing on Mother’s Day. And on the feast of the Holy Family, usually the Sunday after Christmas, the readings always caught my attention.
But over the years, as I attended different parishes during college and beyond, I noticed something odd: Depending on the priest, we’d hear different versions of readings from Colossians and Ephesians about how a man and…

June 9th, 2008

“Do you think Barack Obama should choose Hillary Clinton to be his running mate?”…

June 6th, 2008

June 5, 2008. Memorial of Saint Boniface, bishop and martyr. Father Dave asks us to look to the martyrs for inspiration and strength to carry burdens of all kinds for one another.St. Malachy’s Church, Broadway and 49th, Times Square, New York City. Thursday, June 6, 2008, 12:15pm Mass.…

June 6th, 2008
Prince Caspian struggles to recapture the magic of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

It’s not easy being a villain in Narnia. Twice now, in the two movies based on C.S. Lewis’ beloved series, the bad guys begin with the whole world in their hands, only to be thwarted—like some mythic, British take on Scooby Doo—by a band of meddling kids.
Narnia can be a pretty brutal place for filmmakers as well. Lewis’ books have spawned millions of passionate, highly defensive devotees across three generations. Meaning that anybody who dares to put their beloved tales on screen does so at their own peril. They also risks the scorn of movie critics, who are as notoriously finicky as any Narnia fans, and perhaps even less rational.
No surprise, then, that director Andrew Adamson has come out of Prince Caspian…

June 6th, 2008

In this episode of Mass Class Wednesday on The Busted Halo Show, Father Dave handles some call-in questions about some parishioners’ fear of germs and the sign of peace, whether or not the GIRM dictates a particular sign of peace, and how to go about starting a young adult ministry. (Originally aired: 05/28/08) The Busted Halo Show with Father Dave Dwyer is on Sirius Satellite Radio, Channel 159, Monday through Friday, 7:00pm to 10:00pm EST. Give us a call: 1-888-3-CATHOLIC. Go to www.sirius.com to get subscription information.…

May 29th, 2008
The personal computing pioneer on philanthropy and “Life After Apple”

He was a Cal-Berkeley dropout who sought to impress his friends in a local computer and electronics hobby club with a slick, new invention that in turn ended up selling incredibly well and starting a revolution in the computer industry.
Stephen Gary “Woz” Wozniak, is best known as the co-founder of Apple Computer and the inventor of the first two personal computers, the Apple I and Apple II, in the mid-1970s. Since leaving Apple in 1985 he has directed most of his efforts toward philanthropy. In 2007, MTV Real World… Alumn, Joe Patane, now, a social worker and close friend of Woz, asked for his collaboration in forming a new camping experience focused on creativity and technology alongside living in

May 29th, 2008
The Obama campaign in the South is working overtime to correct the rumor that their candidate is a Muslim

A recent telephone call illustrates the problem.
Deb Geissler of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, is working the phone bank for Barack Obama headquarters in her home state, when she reaches a man who bristles at the mention of her candidate’s name.
“Obama?” he asks, sounding offended. “Isn’t he the Muslim one?”
“No, sir” answers Geissler. “He’s a Christian.”
“Well, I heard he’s Muslim.”
Faith in Barack…
 
Geissler recounts this story to me on an unseasonably cold, gloomy Friday in Aiken, South Carolina. It’s the day before the South Carolina Democratic primary, and Geissler—a middle-aged nurse with piercing blue-grey

May 22nd, 2008
Some Navajo Indians mix Christianity with the old ways

Raymond Lewis, a retired mechanic living in the Navajo Nation in Arizona, tucks away his rosary and rises from kneeling and praying in front of a statue of the Virgin Mary in his living room, “Tonight, I take peyote and maybe see the Mother Mary,” he says.
Lewis, a 67-year-old full-blooded Navajo, who preferred not to use his real name, says he’s not unlike many Native Americans who practice their Catholic faith alongside their native religion. “There’s no contradiction. Both religions speak of being kind and living in harmony with one another, the Creator and nature,” Lewis says as he straightens a picture of a Navajo goddess, hanging behind the statue of Mary.
The Peyote… Way
Lewis says

May 21st, 2008
Expelled manages to lose Ben Stein’s funny

Since his first, monotone date with cinematic history in 1986’s Ferris Bueller, Ben Stein has carved a public career out of slight, but reliably charming variations on a single character: himself. Stein has been a supporting player in TV series and movies, a commercial pitchman (remember those Clear Eyes ads?), the host of the late, great Comedy Central quiz show Win Ben Stein’s Money…, and, more earnestly, a news pundit on CBS. His wardrobe—always a drab-colored suit, always a pair of canvas sneakers laced up with immaculately white shoestrings—seems the perfect extension of his persona. Bookish, phlegmatic and self-deprecatingly funny, he looks at once like the smartest and

May 20th, 2008

“In what way are you affected by the news of natural disasters abroad?”…

May 19th, 2008
Catholic Theologian John Haught Speaks with BustedHalo about Ecology, Religious Education and its Influences on Young People

Dr. John F. Haught has spent nearly 40 years as an educational innovator in creating an understanding of religion combined with educational facets of cosmology, biology and ecology. In 2002 he was the winner of the Owen Garrigan Award in Science and Religion which honors an individual who has made outstanding contributions to the fields of science and religion.
Haught was recognized in 2004 with the Sophia Award for Theological Excellence. The Sophia Award is given annually in several categories by the Washington Theological Union, recognizing leaders in religious education and ministry.
Aside from leading the Theology department at Georgetown University, Dr. Haught was the only theologian to testify…

May 17th, 2008

Do you have financial debt? How do you feel about debt?…

May 14th, 2008
...or, How in the world did the creator of Roger Rabbit and the Archbishop of Newark end up collaborating on a sci-fi novel together?

The book is called Space Vulture, and it’s a far-out, one-of-a-kind project, even by science fiction standards. The cover features a throwback, Flash-Gordon-style photo of a caped villain with a ray gun. And next to the picture are the names of the two writers: the first is Gary K. Wolf, a sci-fi veteran and the creator of Roger Rabbit; the second—God’s honest truth—is the Most Reverend Archbishop John J. Myers of Newark, New Jersey.
It might sound like an improbable partnership. But the truth is that these lifelong friends have been looking for a way to work together since their boyhood in rural Illinois. The result is Space Vulture…, published this spring (TOR Books, $20.95). In an interview

May 12th, 2008
C.S. Lewis' stepson discusses Prince Caspian, life with Lewis and America's "trivial" Christianity

The Chronicles of Narnia has been a classic of children’s literature for over a half century, beloved by millions of readers the world over who are intimately familiar with—and highly protective of—the fantasy world created by C.S. Lewis over the course of the seven novels he wrote between 1949-1954. None of the devout, however, have the sort of perspective on Narnia that Douglas Gresham does.
Young Douglas was just eight years old—and already an enormous Narnia… fan —when his mother, Joy Davidman, Christian convert who moved to England from the United States, married C.S. Lewis and moved into “The Kilns,” the home Lewis shared with his brother, Warnie, in Oxford,

May 9th, 2008
A daughter reflects on her deeply religious mother's struggle to come out of the closet and remain Catholic

“I need to tell you something.” My mom said. “Okay.” I prepared myself for something tragic, when instead I heard, “I’m not Catholic anymore, I just thought you should know.”
My mother’s religious coming out was overshadowed by the more familiar kind of coming out that had occurred five years prior. I was seventeen years old when she announced she was a lesbian. I am as aware as I can be of how difficult coming out was for my Mom. It was something she had been grappling with for the 30 years of my parents’ marriage. But this new announcement baffled me at the time; somehow leaving Catholicism seemed much more entwined in her life long identity.
When I was six…

May 8th, 2008
Men DO want to marry their mothers

If the old saying is true that men want to marry a woman like their mother, then this Mother’s Day, let’s thank moms for leading the way toward gender equality for a younger generation.
New York Times’… columnist Maureen Dowd has long complained that today’s men are a bunch of insecure wimps who are intimidated by smart—high achieving women and, she argues only want to marry their mother or some intellectually inferior woman to avoid their masculinity being threatened.
The Dowd pronouncements have caused millions of today’s high achieving women to fret over their probabilities of ever getting married. It turns out that Ms. Dowd is correct: Today’s men do want to

May 8th, 2008
Iraqi-Americans in the Detroit area struggle with the extinction of their religious roots

I had not seen her in over 20 years but when I came across her sitting at a table in the ballroom I immediately knew it was Mrs. N. The mother of a grade school friend, Mrs. N used to prepare food for us that was simultaneously exotic to my child’s palate, yet also quite comforting. Back then I knew that Pierre, my young friend, and his family were Chaldean; I could say the word but I did not fathom the civilization, history and culture contained therein. The family had come to the U.S. from Iraq in the early seventies and, like many other Arabs of both Muslim and Christian faiths, settled in the vicinity of Detroit, Michigan.
She looked the same, save that her black hair had turned almost completely white. After introducing…

May 7th, 2008
Please complete our questionnaire

The controversial comments made by Barack Obama’s pastor, Jeremiah Wright has re ignited a debate among many Americans as to how religious leaders should approach political issues of the day when they are preaching to their congregations. The pulpit has historically been a place where these sorts of topics are discussed—often sparking controversy.
BustedHalo® is interested in compiling answers to the following questions from as broad a cross section as possible of preachers (priests, ministers, rabbis, imams etc) who regularly give sermons to their congregations.
Please pass this questionnaire onto as many priests, ministers, rabbis, imams etc as possible.…
Click here to submit your

May 6th, 2008

“What was it like to experience the Pope in person?”
(Gathered while broadcasting Sirius’ radio’s BustedHalo Show from the lawn of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C.) …

powered by the Paulists